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Eleala Avanitele, Tuvalu Red Cross Society

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:26
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UNFPA Director Dr. Natalia Kanem Explains What You Need to Know About The Nairobi Summit on ICPD25

UN Dispatch - 7. November 2019 - 17:26

Twenty five years ago the city of Cairo, Egypt hosted a UN-backed gathering of international development professionals from nearly every country on the earth. That 1994 meeting was called the International Conference on Population and Development, or the ICPD, and it became one of the most significant global development gatherings of the last quarter century. At the conference over 170 countries signed was was known as an “action plan” that for the first time recognized fulfilling the rights of women and girls is central to development.

That Cairo conference 25 conference firmly established what is now taken as a given around the UN and in the development community more broadly: that development is not possible without promoting the health and eduction of women and girls.

That was 25 years ago. And this month, in Nairobi, Kenya global development experts, government officials and other key stakeholders are meeting for what is known as the Nairobi Summit ICPD25, to mark a quarter century since that landmark Cairo conference.

On the line with me to discuss why the International Conference on Population and Development was such a watershed moment for the international community, what progress has been made since then, and what to expect at the Nairobi summit is Dr. Natalia Kanem.

She is the executive director of the United Nations Population Fund and very much at the helm of planning the Nairobi conference. More importantly though, her agency, UNFPA, is very much the focal point for global efforts to promote the health, rights, and eduction of women and girls around the world. So, our conversation today serves as both a curtain raiser to the Nairobi summit and also a stocktaking of what kinds of progress has been made on the rights and health of women and girls since the ICPD 25 year ago.

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The post UNFPA Director Dr. Natalia Kanem Explains What You Need to Know About The Nairobi Summit on ICPD25 appeared first on UN Dispatch.

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Shadwig Edward, Red Cross Micronesia volunteer

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:24
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Beyond Recognition: Connect Facilities

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:03
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Beyond Recognition: Defining Clinical Standards

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:03
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Beyond Recognition: Empower Nursing Staff

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:03
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Beyond Recognition: Assess Performance

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:03
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Beyond Recognition: Nurse Jessy’s story

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:03
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Beyond Recognition: Nurse Shital’s story

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:02
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Beyond Recognition: Nurse Rani’s story

Devex - 7. November 2019 - 17:02
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18th Steering Committee Meeting

Effective Co-operation - 7. November 2019 - 16:12
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GPEDC Global Action Plan

Effective Co-operation - 7. November 2019 - 16:01
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Low and high-tech applications

D+C - 7. November 2019 - 11:25
VENRO study shows chances and limits of digital instruments in development aid

Digital technology facilitate access to knowledge and give scope to political and economic engagement. They thus offer opportunities for improving the conditions many people live in. Moreover, digital applications can improve the efficiency, design, outreach and transparency of development efforts. Therefore, many NGOs are relying on such options.

One of the advantages is that not everyone involved in a project has to be at the same place at the same time. Data can be collected locally for evaluation anywhere else in the world. It has become easier to offer sustained schooling to Syrian children in Jordanian refugee camps or to children in Argentina’s remote areas. One app can even help refugees struggling with depressive and post-traumatic disorders wherever they may be. This app is available in several languages free of charge (see http://almhar.org/).

The VENRO report provides an overview of various pilot projects as well as of the state of digitalisation in general. They range from low-tech (radio or SMS-based) to medium-tech (based on smartphones, tablets and social media) to high-tech instruments (such as the linking of smartphones, satellites and digital maps or the use of drones). What fits best in which context differs from case to case. The latest technology is not always the best choice. Established services such as text messaging often have higher impacts.

A prime example of a useful low-tech instrument is M-Pesa, the mobile-payment system many people in Africa depend on. It enables them to carry out financial transactions by text message and has become a driver of economic growth and social development.

According to the VENRO study, many technologies are still at an early stage, but could offer new approaches for rising to challenges in the future. For example, drones might serve to deliver pharmaceuticals to inaccessible regions. They could also be used to monitor deforestation and illegal action in general.

On the upside, digitalisation can thus be an important contribution to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (see Hackmann and Messner in the Tribune section of D+C/E+Z e-Paper 2019/11). At the same time, it poses new challenges for NGOs. The monopoly positions of multinational corporations such as Google or Facebook, insufficient regulatory frameworks and reckless profit maximisation may thwart development. Innovative methods of communication do not automatically bring about fairness or sustainability, nor do they necessarily deepen democracy. The flip side of the coin is manipulation, surveillance, censorship, intimidation and disinformation (see Focus section in D+C/E+Z e-Paper 2019/09).

The digital divide itself remains a major challenge. According to the VENRO authors, about half of the world population still has no access to the internet, and the people concerned tend to be marginalised in social and economic terms. They are the main target groups for developmental NGOs. It is worrisome, moreover, that many questions concerning the protection of personal data remain unresolved.

Link

VENRO: Tech for Good. Möglichkeiten und Grenzen digitaler Instrumente in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von Nichtregierungsorganisationen (“Tech for good. Chances and limits of digital instruments in the development cooperation of non-governmental organisations” – only in German).
https://venro.org/fileadmin/user_upload/Dateien/Daten/Publikationen/Dokumentationen/NRO-Report_TechForGood_v04.pdf

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Help with digital technology

D+C - 7. November 2019 - 11:05
KfW supports targeted and efficient disbursement of transfer payments in Malawi using digital technology

The programme targets the poorest ten per cent of needy households in Malawi. They receive cash payments not subject to conditions, so they can decide for themselves how to spend the money. The government sets the amount of the transfer payments based on the need for food, clothing, health care, school attendance and other things.

Cash payments are limited to a certain period of time. The plan is to support the selected target group for four years. Data will then be collected again.

Since many poor families in Malawi do not have a bank account, other ways had to be found to disburse the money. The families can collect their money every two months at paypoints, which are set up on a village square or in front of a school, for example. The process is coordinated via a management information system – a computerised database that stores all the data.

The beneficiaries are issued an “ID card” that proves their status as authorised claimants. The card contains a barcode, which the employees of the district authorities scan on site. This allows the recipient’s data to be accessed directly. The district officials then know how much the person is due to receive for his or her household and the sum is handed over in cash.

The process is still quite complex. The district official sets up a folding table and IT equipment supported by a mobile power unit at the paypoint, as there is almost no public electricity supply in Malawi. The administrative employee goes through the process from identification to payment with each client on site.

KfW would like to make more use of digital processes such as e-payment in Malawi in the future. However, the necessary conditions have not yet been created for this to be possible across the board. The beneficiaries – often elderly people – lack the most basic technical knowledge and have not yet used more modern payment methods. This makes it difficult to use these technologies. “The administrative workload has already been considerably reduced through improved processes,” says department director Bettina Tewinkel.

External evaluations attest to the success of the programme: “It has made an effective contribution to alleviating poverty in Malawi and the living conditions of the families have improved. They eat more regularly, more children go to school and stay in school longer overall,” explains Tewinkel.

KfW Development Bank is implementing the SCTP on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and the European Union (EU) in 14 of Malawi’s 28 districts, covering around 130,000 households occupied by more than 580,000 individuals.
 

Link
KfW, 2019: Africa – continent of opportunity.
https://www.kfw-entwicklungsbank.de/PDF/Download-Center/PDF-Dokumente-Medienkooperation-mit-E-Z/2019_10_Afrika_E.pdf

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German farming technology for Ethiopian vocational schools

D+C - 7. November 2019 - 10:38
The education sector plays a key role in advancing Ethiopia’s economic development

Ethiopia is a multi-ethnic country that is home to 100 million people and has incredible potential in the fields of agriculture, industry and tourism. In recent years, the country’s economy has seen some of the strongest growth in the world.

It is a nation with breathtaking landscapes, its own script and a history that stretches back thousands of years. Not without reason is Ethiopia called the “cradle of humanity”. The country was already inhabited about 3 million years ago, as proven by a skeleton discovered in 1974: “Lucy” is now housed in the National Museum in Addis Ababa. Coffee, an important export product, originated in Ethiopia, while other agricultural products include cereals and cut flowers. Agriculture is the cornerstone of the economy, accounting for more than 40 per cent of GDP and about 85 per cent of exports.

The education sector plays a key role in advancing the country’s economic development and creating opportunities for its growing population. Since the 1960s, KfW Development Bank has been committed to improving vocational schools and teacher training – including in the agricultural sector – and has provided more than EUR 1 billion to date. Problems that stand in the way of increased productivity: a low level of mechanisation, defective agricultural machinery and spare parts that are difficult to procure. In many places, there are no mechanics who can maintain and repair the machinery. In 2019, KfW Development Bank will provide EUR 8 million to twelve agricultural vocational schools to equip them with tractors and other “medium technology level” machinery on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). Teachers and students are trained in operation, maintenance and repair. To this end, a training cooperation was agreed with the German agricultural machinery manufacturer Claas, which supplies the necessary machinery including spare parts and – as the only company in the country – operates a training centre with twelve mobile workshops.

Samrawit Kiros Haylu has been working as a teacher at the Wukro Agricultural College since October 2018. She holds a bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering and was one of the first to benefit from the practical training after the tractors arrived. What exactly does her job involve? “I work as a driving instructor – this of course also includes driving with auxiliary equipment like a plough. But I’m also responsible for repairs and maintenance, along with instruction in safety and theory.” About half of the almost 800 students and about 40 per cent of the teaching staff are women. And what is it like for male students to be taught mechanics and tractor driving by a woman? “When we have the opportunity as women to prove ourselves in a job, we are very tough and conscientious. A good prerequisite for successful instruction,” Samrawit says.
 

Link
KfW, 2019: Africa – continent of opportunity.
https://www.kfw-entwicklungsbank.de/PDF/Download-Center/PDF-Dokumente-Medienkooperation-mit-E-Z/2019_10_Afrika_E.pdf

Kategorien: english

THEMATIC WORKSHOP ON ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION FOR THE POST-2020 GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY FRAMEWORK

Women - 6. November 2019 - 18:50

The CBD Secretariat accepted our participation in the THEMATIC WORKSHOP ON ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION FOR THE POST-2020 GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY FRAMEWORK -Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 6-8 November 2019 and related pre-workshops

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 4-5 November, 2019.

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UN75 2020 and Beyond: Shaping our Future Together

UNSDN - 6. November 2019 - 18:31

To mark UN Day on 24 October 2019, Secretary-General António Guterres has announced that next year’s commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the United Nations will feature a large and inclusive global conversation on the role of global cooperation in building the future we want.

Starting in January 2020, the United Nations will hold dialogues around the world and across borders, sectors and generations. The aim is to is reach the global public; to listen to their hopes and fears; and to learn from their experiences.

The United Nations was founded in 1945 to support collective action to realize peace, development and human rights for all. The UN75 initiative seeks to spark dialogue and action on how we can build a better world despite the many challenges we face.

While UN75 seeks to drive conversation in all segments of society – from classrooms to boardrooms, parliaments to village halls – it will place special emphasis on youth and those whose voices are too often marginalized or not heard in global affairs.

In a new film released, the UN Secretary-General appealed to people everywhere to add their voices to this campaign: “We need your opinions, your strategies, your ideas for us to be able to deliver better for the people of the world that we must serve.”

Through the upcoming dialogues, UN75 aims to build a global vision for the year 2045, the UN’s centenary; to increase understanding of the threats to that future; and to drive collective action to realize that vision. Global opinion polling and media analysis will be conducted in parallel to provide statistically representative data.

The views and ideas that are generated will be presented to world leaders and senior UN officials at a high-profile event during the 75th Session of the General Assembly in September 2020, and disseminated online and through partners on an ongoing basis. There are no limits or requirements for those who want to be a part of the conversation – physically or online.

Source: UN DGC and the UN75 Campaign

Kategorien: english

UN75 2020 and Beyond: Shaping our Future Together

UNSDN - 6. November 2019 - 18:31

To mark UN Day on 24 October 2019, Secretary-General António Guterres has announced that next year’s commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the United Nations will feature a large and inclusive global conversation on the role of global cooperation in building the future we want.

Starting in January 2020, the United Nations will hold dialogues around the world and across borders, sectors and generations. The aim is to is reach the global public; to listen to their hopes and fears; and to learn from their experiences.

The United Nations was founded in 1945 to support collective action to realize peace, development and human rights for all. The UN75 initiative seeks to spark dialogue and action on how we can build a better world despite the many challenges we face.

While UN75 seeks to drive conversation in all segments of society – from classrooms to boardrooms, parliaments to village halls – it will place special emphasis on youth and those whose voices are too often marginalized or not heard in global affairs.

In a new film released, the UN Secretary-General appealed to people everywhere to add their voices to this campaign: “We need your opinions, your strategies, your ideas for us to be able to deliver better for the people of the world that we must serve.”

Through the upcoming dialogues, UN75 aims to build a global vision for the year 2045, the UN’s centenary; to increase understanding of the threats to that future; and to drive collective action to realize that vision. Global opinion polling and media analysis will be conducted in parallel to provide statistically representative data.

The views and ideas that are generated will be presented to world leaders and senior UN officials at a high-profile event during the 75th Session of the General Assembly in September 2020, and disseminated online and through partners on an ongoing basis. There are no limits or requirements for those who want to be a part of the conversation – physically or online.

Source: UN DGC and the UN75 Campaign

The post UN75 2020 and Beyond: Shaping our Future Together appeared first on UNSDN - United Nations Social Development Network.

Kategorien: english

Step up action to protect the planet during wartime: UN environment chief

UN #SDG News - 6. November 2019 - 17:50
Greater action is needed to protect the environment during wartime if the world is to realize the goal of a more sustainable future for all people and the planet, the head of the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) warned on Wednesday.
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