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Count the Nuclear Weapons Money: 7 days and 7 nights for nuclear disarmament

30. Oktober 2019 - 13:21

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“Imagine you have a lot of money, what do you find better? To buy food for 1 million starving children or for the ability to kill them all?”

This is one of the questions that Senior Advisor of the World Future Council and ideator of the Count the Money event, Holger Güssefeld, imagines asking his 3-year-old granddaughter. The message, registered to kick-off the event “Count the Nuclear Weapons Money”, currently taking place in New York, is very clear:  “This is one of the most stupid questions in the world, and yet we are still spending enourmous sums of money on nuclear weapons instead of tackling the most urgent problems of the world, such as climate change and humanitarian and social issues.”

The intention of Count the Nuclear Weapons Money is to show the true scale of the investments that nine countries are planning for the modernisation of their nuclear arsenals over the next 10 years. Volunteers in New York, London, New Mexico, Philadelphia and Wellington gathered to manually count $1 Trillion over 7 days and 7 nights. Starting on the 24th of October until the end of the day today, the volunteers have been counting  $100 million per minute in $1million dollar notes, and symbolically re-allocating them to climate protection, poverty alleviation, and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The event is part of Move the Nuclear Weapons Money, an international campaign launched in 2016 during the 135th Inter-Parliamentary Union Assembly, by the Basel Peace Office, International Peace Bureau, World Future Council and Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament. Its goal is to cut nuclear weapons budgets and encourage divestment from companies manufacturing nuclear weapons and their delivery systems, while reallocating these budgets and investments to meet economic, social and environmental needs. 

Since then, a number of organisations and networks joined the campaign: Global Security Institute, UNFOLD ZERO, World Federalist Movement and the Abolition 2000 Working Group on Economic Dimensions of Nuclearism. The campaign also  works in close cooperation with the  350.org Go Fossil Free divestment campaign and the Global Campaign on Military Spending.

You can follow the event on YouTube and Facebook

The post Count the Nuclear Weapons Money: 7 days and 7 nights for nuclear disarmament appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

An Inspiring Future Policy Award Ceremony 2019 Celebrated the World’s Most Impactful Policies Empowering Youth

21. Oktober 2019 - 14:32

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post An Inspiring Future Policy Award Ceremony 2019 Celebrated the World’s Most Impactful Policies Empowering Youth appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

FPA 2019: Call for Nominations

11. Oktober 2019 - 11:50

Exemplary policies that empower young people: Nominations are open!

The World Future Council has joined forces with the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), with the support of the Office of the UN Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, the International Labour Organisation (ILO), Michael Otto Foundation, Jua Foundation and Youth Policy Labs, to kick off a global contest to find the world’s most exemplary laws and policies empowering youth. And now we need your help to find them!

Every year, the most visionary policies tackling humankind’s most pressing challenges are celebrated through the Future Policy Award (FPA), the only global award that recognises policies for the benefit of present and future generations. The World Future Council has awarded this annual prize since 2010 in partnership with UN agencies and other organisations like the IPU. Recognising that youth empowerment is a key element to achieve the 2030 Agenda and address key sustainable development and justice challenges, the Future Policy Award 2019 will identify and honour policies that empower young people through decent and sustainable jobs as well as civic and political participation for sustainable development and peace.

We are particularly interested in nominations of innovative and impactful laws, policies and legal frameworks that create enabling environments and empower young people in the following fields:

  • Economic empowerment of young women and men in decent and sustainable jobs
  • Youth civic engagement and political participation in support of sustainable development and peace.

The award will highlight proven policies that effectively promote and scale up local, national and international youth empowerment solutions. We seek policies that advance the economic empowerment of young women and men in decent and sustainable jobs, for instance, youth skills development programmes that pave the way for youth to build the green economy we need. It also encompasses youth entrepreneurship or programmes targeting particularly vulnerable groups such as women. We also seek inspiring laws that enable much more civic engagement and political participation of youth. This includes, for instance, policies that promote youth representation in politics and decision-making, and enhance the integration of youth perspectives at all levels of governance.


Call for Nominations - English
Llamado de candidaturas – Español
Appel à candidatures – Français

Representatives of international organizations, academia, non-governmental organizations, parliaments, government agencies, and others have until the 31st of May to nominate outstanding policies through the online form or with the downloadable form. Winners will be selected by a high-level jury of experts and announced in October 2019 at a ceremony in Belgrade, Serbia, during the 141st IPU Assembly.

The post FPA 2019: Call for Nominations appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release: Future Policy Award 2019 crowns eight best policies empowering youth at global summit of parliaments

11. Oktober 2019 - 10:10

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release: Future Policy Award 2019 crowns eight best policies empowering youth at global summit of parliaments appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Renewable energy: a catalyst for gender equality?

4. Oktober 2019 - 16:41


Renewable energy: a catalyst for gender equality?

Matteo Hanitsch

The Canadian environmentalist and filmmaker, James Cameron, once explained: “The nation that leads in renewable energy will be the nation that leads the world.” This statement may seem bizarre at first but it is actually reasonable and probably even true. I personally think, Cameron tried to highlight the numerous opportunities renewable energies hold and the enormous power connected to these. Indeed, they can alleviate a host of ills that beset us. Renewables go hand in hand with all 17 global goals and may have a huge impact, if used in the right way. Achieving gender equality and empowering women is one of these goals.

Globally, gender inequality is one of the major issues to combat in the 21st century. The 5th Global Goal states that gender inequality is not only a human rights issue but primarily a waste of the world’s human potential as many women can’t live life at its fullest. Renewable energies can empower women because they enhance substantive and procedural rights, as women are seen as not only rights holders but also critical partners and development actors. Women are able to be independent, contributing to household, income and wellbeing. This allows them to use their variety of skills benefitting the world socially as well as economically. Renewable energies have got the ability to play a significant role in this struggle and strengthen women’s self- esteem.

Status quo is that in the entire energy sector only 20-25% of employees are female in contrast to 35% in the renewable energy sector1. Nowadays, the energy sector experiences a fundamental shift towards a renewable, democratized and decarbonized energy system. This transition creates several social and economic benefits such as growing employment. According to ‘IRENA’ the number of jobs in the sector could increase rapidly from 10.3 million in 2017 to nearly 29 million in 2050.2 I strongly believe that it is crucial using this shift to finally achieve the goals of gender equality and clean energy. One would to kill two birds with one stone.

The Productive Use of Renewable Energy (PURE) project in Guatemala initially aimed to promote sustainable energy as means for community development. However after a gender gap in women’s participation became apparent, the projects focus redeployed on promoting women’s participation in decision making. This occurred because the managers wanted to increase the project’s efficiency and ensure a sustainable development of the community in the future. The project “removed barriers by promoting spaces for expression and strengthening women’s self- esteem”3.This was achieved by participating in capacity- building workshops or gaining skills traditionally reserved for men. Women being part in the renewable energy sector were reported feeling ‘empowered’ becoming a solar entrepreneur4. 

This is only one specific example that illustrates how the energy transition can empower women. In fact renewable energy is not only essential to counter climate change but also is a driver in sustainable development. 

About the author:

Matteo interned with the WFC in the Climate Energy Team in September 2019. He is a student in Hamburg, with a particular interest in climate protection. 

Bibliography 

1: IRENA, “Renewable energy and jobs: Annual review 2016”, Abu Dhabi, 2016

2: IRENA, “Gender equality for an inclusive energy transition”, Abu Dhabi, 2019

3: Sibyl Nelson and Anne Kuriakose, “Gender and renewable energy. Entry points for       women’s livelihoods and employment”, 2017

4: UN WOMEN, “Sustainable energy for all: The gender dimensions”, Vienna, 2013

The post Renewable energy: a catalyst for gender equality? appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

September News

30. September 2019 - 16:58

The post September News appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Inspiring event on Solutions for Scaling up Agroecology held at Heliopolis University

19. September 2019 - 10:39

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Inspiring event on Solutions for Scaling up Agroecology held at Heliopolis University appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release -Securing a World of Climate Resilience, Prosperity and Peace. World leaders identify solutions and call for immediate action

16. September 2019 - 10:48

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release -Securing a World of Climate Resilience, Prosperity and Peace. World leaders identify solutions and call for immediate action appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release: Solutions for scaling up agroecology exist

12. September 2019 - 10:05

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release: Solutions for scaling up agroecology exist appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Impactful UNCCD COP14 event on agroecology and organic agriculture in the Himalayas and new study launched

11. September 2019 - 11:57

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Impactful UNCCD COP14 event on agroecology and organic agriculture in the Himalayas and new study launched appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

FPA 2019: 67 policies from 36 countries contest for Future Policy Award received

10. September 2019 - 12:19

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post FPA 2019: 67 policies from 36 countries contest for Future Policy Award received appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release – Champions in empowering young people: Shortlist of Future Policy Award 2019 out now

10. September 2019 - 12:02

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release – Champions in empowering young people: Shortlist of Future Policy Award 2019 out now appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award 2019: About the shortlisted policies

10. September 2019 - 10:19

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Future Policy Award 2019: About the shortlisted policies appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Solutions for Scaling up Agroecology

5. September 2019 - 11:14

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Solutions for Scaling up Agroecology appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Agroecology and organic agriculture in India and the Himalayas: Enhancing fertile landscapes and improving living conditions

3. September 2019 - 12:08

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Agroecology and organic agriculture in India and the Himalayas: Enhancing fertile landscapes and improving living conditions appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Earth emergency: Governments need to step up action to protect the Amazon

28. August 2019 - 9:57

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Earth emergency: Governments need to step up action to protect the Amazon appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future

20. August 2019 - 10:41

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release – International Youth Day

19. August 2019 - 12:21

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release – International Youth Day appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future

12. August 2019 - 9:00
Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future

67 nominations from 36 countries contest for Future Policy Award received

The World Future Council kicked off its prestigious Future Policy Award in April 2019 to highlight proven policies that effectively promote and scale up local, national, regional and international youth empowerment solutions. With its partners the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), with the support of the Office of the UN Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, the International Labour Organisation (ILO), Michael Otto Foundation, Jua Foundation we sent out our Call for Nominations to over 10,000 experts and representatives of international organizations, academia, non-governmental organizations, government agencies and other noted experts.

We were particularly interested in nominations of innovative and impactful laws, policies and legal frameworks that create enabling environments and empower young people in the following fields:

  • Economic empowerment of young women and men in decent and sustainable jobs
  • Youth civic engagement and political participation in support of sustainable development and peace.

The response was overwhelming receiving 67 nominations from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and Oceania as well as nominations considering international or regional conventions or agreements.

Today, there are 1.8 billion young people – the largest group of young people the world has ever seen. 87% of young people live in the so-called developing world. Young people embody the potential of a society and play a crucial role as key architects of the future of their communities, families and countries. Young people are also on the frontlines of political and social change. They form one of the most powerful driving force for change and development needed to achieve the Agenda 2030.

An independent high level jury will decide on the winning policies after a thorough evaluation process End of August. It is composed of experts in field of youth empowerment and the UN Agenda 2030. Among the jury members are H.E. María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés, President of the 73rd session of the UN General Assembly, Hon. Gabriela Barron, President of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), Charles Chauvel, Head of the Governance team of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Valter Nebuloni, Head of Employment Policy Department of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), Prof. Dr. Michael Otto, Entrepreneur and Honorary Councillor of the World Future Council as well as youth representatives. The winners will be presented at a formal ceremony with the participation of ministers, decision-makers, donors and the media on 16th October 2019, at the 141st Assembly of the IPU in Belgrade, Serbia.

List of nominations
Our High-Level Jury

The post Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg