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Press Release -Securing a World of Climate Resilience, Prosperity and Peace. World leaders identify solutions and call for immediate action

16. September 2019 - 10:48

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release -Securing a World of Climate Resilience, Prosperity and Peace. World leaders identify solutions and call for immediate action appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Impactful UNCCD COP14 event on agroecology and organic agriculture in the Himalayas and new study launched

11. September 2019 - 11:57

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Impactful UNCCD COP14 event on agroecology and organic agriculture in the Himalayas and new study launched appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

FPA 2019: 67 policies from 36 countries contest for Future Policy Award received

10. September 2019 - 12:19

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post FPA 2019: 67 policies from 36 countries contest for Future Policy Award received appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release – Champions in empowering young people: Shortlist of Future Policy Award 2019 out now

10. September 2019 - 12:02

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release – Champions in empowering young people: Shortlist of Future Policy Award 2019 out now appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award 2019: About the shortlisted policies

10. September 2019 - 10:19

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Future Policy Award 2019: About the shortlisted policies appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Solutions for Scaling up Agroecology

5. September 2019 - 11:14

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Solutions for Scaling up Agroecology appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Agroecology and organic agriculture in India and the Himalayas: Enhancing fertile landscapes and improving living conditions

3. September 2019 - 12:08

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Agroecology and organic agriculture in India and the Himalayas: Enhancing fertile landscapes and improving living conditions appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Earth emergency: Governments need to step up action to protect the Amazon

28. August 2019 - 9:57

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Earth emergency: Governments need to step up action to protect the Amazon appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future

20. August 2019 - 10:41

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release – International Youth Day

19. August 2019 - 12:21

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

The post Press Release – International Youth Day appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future

12. August 2019 - 9:00
Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future

67 nominations from 36 countries contest for Future Policy Award received

The World Future Council kicked off its prestigious Future Policy Award in April 2019 to highlight proven policies that effectively promote and scale up local, national, regional and international youth empowerment solutions. With its partners the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), with the support of the Office of the UN Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, the International Labour Organisation (ILO), Michael Otto Foundation, Jua Foundation we sent out our Call for Nominations to over 10,000 experts and representatives of international organizations, academia, non-governmental organizations, government agencies and other noted experts.

We were particularly interested in nominations of innovative and impactful laws, policies and legal frameworks that create enabling environments and empower young people in the following fields:

  • Economic empowerment of young women and men in decent and sustainable jobs
  • Youth civic engagement and political participation in support of sustainable development and peace.

The response was overwhelming receiving 67 nominations from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and Oceania as well as nominations considering international or regional conventions or agreements.

Today, there are 1.8 billion young people – the largest group of young people the world has ever seen. 87% of young people live in the so-called developing world. Young people embody the potential of a society and play a crucial role as key architects of the future of their communities, families and countries. Young people are also on the frontlines of political and social change. They form one of the most powerful driving force for change and development needed to achieve the Agenda 2030.

An independent high level jury will decide on the winning policies after a thorough evaluation process End of August. It is composed of experts in field of youth empowerment and the UN Agenda 2030. Among the jury members are H.E. María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés, President of the 73rd session of the UN General Assembly, Hon. Gabriela Barron, President of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), Charles Chauvel, Head of the Governance team of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Valter Nebuloni, Head of Employment Policy Department of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), Prof. Dr. Michael Otto, Entrepreneur and Honorary Councillor of the World Future Council as well as youth representatives. The winners will be presented at a formal ceremony with the participation of ministers, decision-makers, donors and the media on 16th October 2019, at the 141st Assembly of the IPU in Belgrade, Serbia.

List of nominations
Our High-Level Jury

The post Future Policy Award 2019 Impactful policies that empower young people for a fair and sustainable Future appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Leaders in Post-Paris Times – Achieving 100% RE in Costa Rica

27. Juni 2019 - 12:08
Leaders in Post-Paris Times – Achieving 100% RE in Costa Rica

Costa Rica’s President Carlos Alvarado has vowed to fully decarbonize the country’s economy and make Costa Rica the first carbon-neutral nation in the world no later than 2020. In addition, the government has launched its Decarbonization Plan in February 2019 to support its contribution to the Paris Agreement. The ambitious Plan aims to eliminate the country’s greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and promote the modernization of the country through green growth.

Costa Rica is already a frontrunner when it comes to the energy transition. Roughly, 95-98% of the country’s electricity has come from renewable sources since 2014, and almost all the population has access to energy. However, despite the nearly 100%RE electricity production, almost 70% of the country’s energy still comes from oil and gas, which is still widely used for fuel based transport and activities like cooking and heating processes in the industry.

La Ruta del Clima and the World Future Council have joint forces in the project “Leaders in Post-Paris Times – Achieving 100% RE in Costa Rica” in order to assess the ways in which the country can transform its entire energy production to renewable energy.

The overall goal of the project is to provide additional support to the local efforts and further cement Costa Rica’s role as a leader in achieving the global energy transition and full decarbonization. The country can act as a lighthouse for the international community in its efforts to implement the Paris Accord and achieve a just and fair energy transition.

The project will create a political roadmap towards realizing the 100% Renewable Energy goal, and it will model pathways towards 100% renewable energy scenarios in order to count with a scientific basis for the roadmap. This process will include the national needs and socio-economic growth objectives and the information will be collected and discussed considering both official projections and the input of different stakeholders relevant for the energy transition: researchers, NGOs, civil society, businesses, and local and national government, among others. For doing so, a first multi-stakeholder workshop will take place on 23 July 2019 in San José.

A second workshop in October 2019 aims at showing the technical results of the model and verifying it with stakeholders. After that, the policy roadmap presenting suggested political actions will be made publicly available with the aim that key actors in the Costa Rican decision-making towards the energy transition benefit from it to support a pathway towards full decarbonization of its economy and society. The leadership in Costa Rica would have the opportunity to implement parts of the 100% Renewable Energy scenario and policy roadmap to demonstrate the feasibility of transitioning to 100% Renewable Energy across energy sectors. Findings will be particularly relevant to countries in the region and beyond with similar geographical and demographic circumstances and might lead to increased cross-border activities. The project will also provide capacity building opportunities for Costa Rican civil society organizations to engage in the global climate action and will present its results at COP25.

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Kategorien: Hamburg

June News

27. Juni 2019 - 11:53

The post June News appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Solutions Scaling up Agroecology: We are now Collaborator of the PANORAMA platform

23. Juni 2019 - 9:00

Solutions Scaling up Agroecology: We are now Collaborator of the PANORAMA platform

We proudly joined the PANORAMA – Solutions for a Healthy Planet initiative by UNEP, UNDP, GIZ, IFOAM – Organics International, IUCN and Rare, as new collaborator. Since a few weeks, the PANORAMA platform features the policy solutions that we identified and awarded with our unique Future Policy Award, the first international prize celebrating laws and policies that create better living conditions for current and future generations. In 2018, the World Future Council awarded with its Future Policy Award exemplary policies that scale up agroecology, contribute to the protection of life and livelihoods of small-scale food producers, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement climate resilient agricultural practices, in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and IFOAM – Organics International.

The “100% organic state” Sikkim, in India, won this year’s “Oscar for best policies”, beating 51 nominated policies from 25 countries. Policies from Brazil, Denmark and Quito (Ecuador) took home Silver Awards. Honourable Mentions were given to programmes from Los Angeles (USA), Ndiob (Senegal) and to Kauswagan (Philippines), whilst this year’s Future Policy Vision Award went to the path-breaking TEEBAgriFood Initiative. Find out more about the winning policies on the PANORAMA platform, for instance read the beautiful personal story from Ms Mala Sherpa, who is living in the village of Bul, in the 100% organic state Sikkim in India, our Future Policy Gold Award winner, at: https://bit.ly/2U1wXkG    

The Future Policy Award 2018 was organized in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and IFOAM – Organics International, with the support of the Sekem Group (Egypt), DO-IT – Dutch Organic International Trade and Green Cross International. A festive Award Ceremony was held on 15th October 2018, during World Food Week 2018 at FAO Headquarters in Rome, Italy.

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Fridays For Future climate strike in Hamburg through the eyes of a French student

6. Juni 2019 - 14:00

My name is Oona. I am 23, I am French and I study politics. I joined the World Future Council in May 2019 as an intern for the Future Policy Award 2019: Empowering Youth. A few days ago, I participated in the “Fridays For Future” march in Hamburg.

From Sankt Pauli to Rathausmarkt: discovering the German way of protesting

Doing the Fridays For Future march was totally new for me, as it was the first time I participated in this strike in Germany. Before going to the protest, I had only heard about the international movement launched by Greta Thunberg in Medias. I had also seen the demonstration from afar in Brussels last January, but I could not participate. So this mission was a chance for me to learn more about this movement, and to take part in it.

We met at 10 am and moved from Sankt Pauli to Rathausmarkt.

The demonstration was quite different from what I had experienced in France. In fact, the atmosphere was more relaxed and festive, and the people were more respectful and enthusiastic. No conflicts, no violence: only young people marching peacefully through the streets of the city, singing with passion: “Wir sind hier, wir sind laut, weil ihr uns die Zukunft klaut!” (“We are here, we are loud because you are stealing our future”). Among the protesters, I felt unity and a strong will to change climate politics. It was really impressive and hopeful to be part of this crowd of young people gathered for climate justice.

“We are here, we are loud because you are stealing our future”

LOL Culture: from the web to the streets

In Brussels, one thing particularly struck my mind: the numerous self-made banners. It was the same in Hamburg. Among the protesters, I could see countless posters with colorful drawings, and slogans such as “Act now” and “Save the world”. There were also a lot of word games and slogans referring to pop culture and politics. The two favorite references were definitely Donald Trump and Game of Thrones – but no spoilers!

All those banners reminded me about the significance of LOL Culture for our generation. LOL means “Laughing Out Loud”. This expression was born on the web ten years ago. It has now exceeded its original meaning and has become a cultural marker for digital natives with the LOL culture. This phenomenon is a product of interactions of the youth with the Medias and other image contents: movies, cartoons, manga, video games, TV shows, the news… LOL Culture combines humor and protest. It expresses potash or absurd jubilation, diverting contents or mocking the institutions and people who shape public life. But behind this irony, there is always social indignation. It clearly influences us, our way of representing the world and our way of addressing it. That is why I was not surprised to see so many comic references to pop culture and politics in the demonstration. Holding those humoristic posters, the demonstrators wanted to denounce and raise awareness about the climate crisis. In their own way, they were calling for a sustainable future. They demanded, among other things, compliance with the Paris Agreements climate goals.

Fridays For Future: a promising movement for climate politics?

On 24th May, around 1,600 cities in more than 120 countries were on strike for the “Fridays For Future”. In Hamburg, the march reached a new participant record. We were between 17,000 and 25,000 young people and adults struggling for climate justice.

The demonstration was clearly politically-charged. In fact, the European parliamentary elections were in everyone´s minds. Many posters highlighted how important it was to vote for climate protection. For people too young to take part in the election, the march seemed to be a way to have their voices heard at the EU-level.

That is why I think that this march and more globally this movement prove that the critics are wrong: young people are not self-centered or politically disinterested. Rather, we are more and more aware of climates issues and engaged in climate politics. We show it in our own way, but basically, our message remains intergenerational: we call for bold actions to face the climate crisis that will impact us and the future generations.

In my opinion, this movement is necessary to really make people aware of climate emergency and to change climate politics. Our generation and the next will have to face this crisis alone if today´s adults and political leaders don´t take their responsibilities.

And now that we have proven our involvement in climate politics, the next step would be to allow us to really be involved and have our voices heard in decisions affecting our future.

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release – Report launch: “Beyond Fire: How To Achieve Electric Cooking”

28. Mai 2019 - 11:57

Hamburg, 28 May 2019. The cost of cooking with renewable electricity is now competitive with the other cooking fuels in most developing countries, concludes a new report called Beyond Fire: How to achieve electric cooking by Hivos and the World Future Council. This is a significant improvement from three years ago when the two organizations first studied this.

Achieving sustainable cooking is one of the great challenges of our time. Cooking with charcoal and firewood sources still accounts for 4 million premature deaths due to indoor air pollution, puts significant strain on already stressed forest resources, and it is the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs).

“For almost two decades we have inadvertently narrowed the debate of clean cooking to just cookstoves. We need to look at the sources of energy and clean fuels”, says Kandeh Yumkella, Parliamentary Leader Sierra Leone, first CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and former UN Special Representative and Director General of UNIDO.

Hivos and the World Future Council (WFC) just released a study that unveils the cost-competitiveness of cooking with renewable energies. Eco Matser, Program Manager Energy & Climate at Hivos responds: “We looked into alternatives that provide long term sustainable solutions rather than quick intermediate fixes such as improved cookstoves”.

The examined cooking appliances are stoves using solid fuels (such as wood and charcoal), gas-based stoves (LPG, biogas, and power to gas) and electric cooking (electric hot plate, induction stove, slow cooker, and pressure cooker), both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems.

“The report shows that the costs of cooking with electricity – both in mini-grid contexts and via solar home systems – is now well within the range of cost-competitiveness of other cooking alternatives. Households spend EUR 1 – EUR 31/month on average for cooking fuels. Electric cooking with Solar Home Systems (SHS) costs between EUR 5 – EUR 15/month while the costs per household of cooking with a mini-grid are in the EUR 4 – EUR 36/month range,” says Anna Leidreiter, Director Climate Energy with the World Future Council.

The entire report can be found here.

MEDIA CONTACT
Nico Scagliarini
Assistant Media & Communications
World Future Council
nico.scagliarini@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 40 3070914-19

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy planet and fair societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions and promote their implementation worldwide. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organization under German law and finance our activities from donations. For information visit www.worldfuturecouncil.org

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Kategorien: Hamburg