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Advancing the child protection system in Ghana: One-Stop-Centers for survivors of child violence

12. Juli 2021 - 14:34
Advancing the child protection system in Ghana: One-Stop-Centers for survivors of child violence World Future Council’s consultant on child protection Ramana Shareef travels to Ghana to further advance the One-Stop-Centre model with key stakeholders.

Accra/Hamburg, 12th July 2021 – For the majority of children in Ghana, violence is a terrible part of their everyday life. According to official statistics, 9 out of 10 children are exposed to mental or physical violence, and physical punishment is a common phenomenon. In most cases, limited action is taken to seek medical or psychosocial help for the victims and their families. One-Stop-Centres, however, provide essential services for survivors of abuse under one roof. To further advance and implement the model in Ghana, the World Future Council’s consultant on Child Protection, Ramana Shareef, is now travelling to Accra, Ghana, to discuss the importance of such a model with government representatives, policymakers, medical professionals, and other stakeholders and advance an inter-ministerial agreement to start implementing the pilot. Crucially, this will include discussions on how to put theory into practice.

One-Stop-Centres (OSC) are central contact points for children and their families affected by violence, including sexualised violence. Here, survivors can find psycho-social support, a police office to initiate criminal investigation, as well as medical treatment including collection of forensic evidence, under one roof. Ideally, access to legal services is also part of the centre.

The main objective of the One Stop Centre model is to play the role of an initial umbrella institution for child survivors of abuse, and to provide access to the most essential services under one roof, involving multisectoral collaboration”, says Samia Kassid, Senior Programme Manager “the Rights of Children and Youth”, World Future Council. “Investment in the strengthening of coordination among all professions at One-Stop-Centres will eventually speed up the legal process, which may lead to an increase in the prosecution of perpetrators and awareness raising on the importance to fight (sexual) violence against children.”

During an international conference on child protection, hosted by the World Future Council in Zanzibar in 2017, the One-Stop-Centre model was introduced, which inspired attending Ghanaian policy makers. In 2018 the World Future Council conducted a technical workshop in Ho/Ghana with key Ghanaian stakeholders working on child protection and representatives from the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection as well Ministry of Interior. Together with experts from Zanzibar they explored during a three days’ workshop its feasibility for Ghana and agreed on a pilot roadmap to start in Accra.

The One-Stop-Centre model as an intervention tool of a well-functioning child protection system is part of the Zanzibar’s Children’s Act 2011, which won the Gold Future Policy Award in 2015. For more information on the Future Policy Award 2015, please visit: https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/future-policy-award-2015

MEDIA CONTACT

Anna-Lara Stehn

Media & Communications Manager

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org



About the World Future Council

The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying, developing, highlighting, and spreading effective, future-just solutions for current challenges humanity is facing, and promote their implementation worldwide. The Council consists of 50 eminent global change-makers from governments, parliaments, civil societies, academia, the arts, and the business world. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organisation under German law and finance our activities with institutional partnerships and donations.

The post Advancing the child protection system in Ghana: One-Stop-Centers for survivors of child violence appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

2021 Future Policy Award Brochure – Protection from Hazardous Chemicals

7. Juli 2021 - 15:22
About the Future Policy Award 2021 Brochure

This brochure is presenting the winners of the Future Policy Award 2021 on Protection from hazardous chemicals.

Championing and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions is the principal goal of the World Future Council. Our Future Policy Award is the first award that celebrates legislation and policies for the benefit of current and future generations at an international level. The aim of the award is to raise global awareness about these exemplary laws and speed up action towards just, sustainable and peaceful societies.

Each year we select a priority topic in which policy action is particularly needed. Some of the key global issues that we have addressed include children’s rights, youth empowerment, food security, agroecology. In 2021, we are awarding policy solutions that protect people, especially children, and the environment from hazardous chemicals.

We are proud to present to you the winners of the Future Policy Award 2021 and we encourage policymakers globally to adopt and implement key elements of these inspiring, innovative and effective policies in their own countries, states and cities.

The Future Policy Award 2021 would not have been possible without our partners and donors! The World Future Council would like to sincerely thank all of them for their generous support – and all the jury members and nominators, researchers and experts who have supported our evaluation process. We are immensely grateful for your precious work and recommendations.Enjoy reading and do visit our website to find out more about the 2021 Awardees.


Read in English (PDF)
Leer en español (PDF)
Lisez en français (PDF)

The post 2021 Future Policy Award Brochure – Protection from Hazardous Chemicals appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir récompense les cinq meilleures initiatives de protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux

6. Juli 2021 - 11:40
Le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir récompense les cinq meilleures initiatives de protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux

Cette année, « l’Oscar » de l’action publique a été décerné à des initiatives de la Colombie, du Kirghizistan, des Philippines, de Sri Lanka et de la Suède.

Genève, Hambourg, Nairobi, Paris, 29 juin 2021 – Le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir est attribué à cinq lois et mesures inspirantes et puissantes. Ce prix, surnommé l’« Oscar des meilleures politiques », récompense les initiatives publiques qui ont le mieux réussi à réduire au minimum les effets néfastes de l’exposition aux produits chimiques sur la santé humaine et l’environnement. Sur les 55 initiatives de 36 pays présélectionnées, deux ont reçu le prix Or et trois le prix Spécial. Les lauréats de cette année sont :

Prix OR

  • Kirghizistan: résolution n° 43 portant approbation du Système de classification des dangers chimiques et des exigences d’information concernant les dangers – Étiquetage et fiche de données de sécurité (2015)
  • Suède (comté de Stockholm): Liste des substances chimiques dangereuses pour l’environnement et la santé humaine devant faire l’objet d’une élimination progressive (2012-16, révisée pour la période 2017-21)

Prix SPÉCIAL

  • Prix spécial « Pesticides très dangereux » : Sri Lanka, Loi n° 33 sur les pesticides (1980, modifiée en 1994, 2011 et 2020) et politique nationale et plan d’action national de prévention du suicide (1997)
  • Prix spécial « Peintures au plomb » : Philippines, décret relatif à la vérification chimique applicable au plomb et à ses composés (2013-24)
  • Prix spécial « Polluants pharmaceutiques persistants » : Colombie, résolution n° 371 portant définition des éléments à prendre en considération dans les plans de gestion des retours de produits pharmaceutiques et de médicaments périmés (2009)

La remise des prix aura lieu le 6 juillet 2021 à l’occasion d’une cérémonie à distance. Pour y participer, il suffit de s’inscrire à l’adresse : https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/fpa-2021-ceremony/. Puis les initiatives lauréates seront à l’honneur le 8 juillet 2021, à l’occasion du Forum de Berlin sur la durabilité des produits chimiques.

Le World Future Council (WFC) organise et décerne ce prix chaque année en partenariat avec le Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE), l’Approche stratégique de la gestion internationale des produits chimiques (SAICM), l’Organisation mondiale du Travail (OIT), l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE), l’Institut des Nations Unies pour la formation et la recherche (UNITAR) et le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD), avec le soutien des fondations Michael Otto et Jua.

« L’absence de gestion rationnelle des produits chimiques, qui font pourtant partie intégrante du quotidien, provoque l’intoxication de notre planète et de toutes les formes de vie qui y existent. Il est absolument impératif de consolider la bonne gouvernance des produits chimiques et des déchets en adoptant des lois et règles efficaces, mobilisatrices et innovantes, à l’image de celles récompensées par le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir. Elles créent un précédent qui, espérons-le, servira à un grand nombre de pays », estime la Directrice exécutive du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE), Inger Andersen.

« Chaque année, 1 500 nouveaux produits chimiques arrivent sur le marché », ajoute Achim Steiner, Administrateur du Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD). « Beaucoup n’ont pas été soumis aux essais de sécurité et de toxicité voulus alors qu’ils peuvent occasionner des dommages irréversibles à la santé humaine, à la faune, à la flore et aux écosystèmes. Les initiatives colombienne, kirghize, philippine, sri-lankaise et suédoise récompensées par le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir sont autant de solutions efficaces pour lutter contre les aspects critiques de cet enjeu mondial. »

Il importe également de prendre en considération l’exposition aux substances chimiques dangereuses dans le milieu professionnel. Il n’est pas rare que les travailleurs soient exposés à des doses plus élevées sur des périodes plus longues, risquant ainsi davantage d’en subir gravement les effets sanitaires. Beaucoup travaillent dans l’économie informelle ou dans des secteurs qui emploient fréquemment de telles substances avec peu de précautions, notamment l’agriculture et les activités extractives. Alors que le monde du travail a besoin de politiques judicieuses, les initiatives lauréates du Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir illustrent comment améliorer la sécurité et la santé au travail et comment promouvoir une gestion rationnelle des produits chimiques et des déchets dans le monde entier. De l’avis du Directeur général de l’Organisation internationale du Travail (OIT), Guy Ryder, « il est de notre devoir de réaffirmer que chacun a le droit de travailler dans un environnement sûr et sain[1] ».

Pour choisir les lauréats parmi la sélection finale, le jury a appliqué les sept principes normatifs d’un avenir juste, qui servent de fondement à une conception unique de l’analyse des politiques. Ainsi que l’explique Jakob von Uexkull, fondateur du World Future Council : « Nous passons au crible chaque initiative en nous interrogeant sur l’essentiel : par exemple, est-ce que l’initiative à l’examen prévoit de consulter le grand public et de l’associer véritablement aux processus de rédaction, d’exécution, de suivi et d’évaluation ? Il convient de noter que la catégorie « Présence de substances chimiques dans les produits » est l’une des rares dans lesquelles aucune candidature n’a été présentée. Il reste encore beaucoup à faire dans ce domaine. Nous nous réjouissons de pouvoir présenter au monde des exemples d’initiatives bénéfiques. Nous nous emploierons à les faire connaître afin qu’elles incitent d’autres pays à se montrer encore plus ambitieux. »

Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous à l’adresse :

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

https://twitter.com/Good_Policies

—-

[1]Édition 2017 du Congrès mondial sur la santé et la sécurité au travail.



Ce projet bénéficie du concours financiers de :   

 

Le contenu de la présente publication relève de la responsabilité de l’éditeur.

Avec le soutien de la Fondation Michael Otto et de la Fondation Jua.



Contact médias

Anna-Lara Stehn

Responsable Médias et Communication

World Future Council

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org

Note aux éditeurs

À propos du Prix de l’action d’avenir

Chaque année, le Prix de l’action d’avenir est attribué aux initiatives les plus efficaces face aux principaux impératifs de l’humanité. Il est actuellement le seul qui récompense, à l’échelle internationale, les politiques mises en œuvre pour le bénéfice des générations présentes et futures. L’objectif est de mieux faire connaître les politiques exemplaires à travers le monde et d’accélérer l’action publique. Le World Future Council décerne ce prix annuel depuis 2010 en partenariat avec les institutions des Nations Unies et l’UIP.

 

À propos des initiatives lauréates du Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

 

À propos du World Future Council

Le World Future Council (WFC) s’est donné pour mission de transmettre à nos enfants et petits-enfants une planète saine et viable ainsi que des sociétés vivant dans la justice et la paix. Pour ce faire, il s’emploie à recenser, à étoffer, à mettre en avant et à diffuser des moyens efficaces et à terme équitables de venir à bout des problèmes qui assaillent aujourd’hui l’humanité, de même qu’il promeut leur mise en œuvre dans le monde entier. Il réunit 50 acteurs du changement de renommée mondiale issus des sphères administrative et parlementaire, de la société civile, du monde de l’université, des arts et des affaires. Lancé en 2007 par Jakob von Uexkull, le fondateur du « Prix Nobel alternatif », Le WFC est une fondation indépendante à but non lucratif de droit allemand, qui finance ses activités grâce aux partenariats institutionnels et aux dons.

Partenaires :

 

À propos du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE) et de l’Approche stratégique de la gestion internationale des produits chimiques (SAICM)

https://www.unep.org/

http://www.saicm.org/

À propos de l’Organisation internationale du Travail (OIT)

https://www.ilo.org/

À propos de l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE)

https://www.oecd.org/fr/

À propos du Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD)

https://www1.undp.org/content/undp/fr/home.html

À propos de l’Institut des Nations Unies pour la formation et la recherche (UNITAR)

https://unitar.org

The post Le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir récompense les cinq meilleures initiatives de protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

El Future Policy Award 2021 premia a las cinco mejores políticas de protección contra las sustancias químicas peligrosas

29. Juni 2021 - 18:14

Foto © Markus Mielek Future Policy Award


El Future Policy Award 2021 premia a las cinco mejores políticas de protección contra las sustancias químicas peligrosas

Las políticas de Colombia, Kirguistán, Filipinas, Sri Lanka y Suecia son las ganadoras de este año del Oscar a las mejores políticas

Ginebra, Hamburgo, Nairobi, París, 29 de junio de 2021 – Cinco leyes y políticas inspiradoras e impactantes se llevan el Future Policy Award 2021. El premio, a menudo conocido como el Oscar de las mejores políticas, celebra las soluciones políticas más eficaces que minimizan los efectos adversos de la exposición a sustancias químicas en la salud humana y el medio ambiente. Se seleccionaron dos ganadores del Oro y tres del Premio Especial entre 55 políticas nominadas de 36 países.

Los ganadores de este año son:

Premios de Oro

  • Kirguistán: Resolución nº 43 sobre la aprobación del sistema de clasificación de los peligros químicos y los requisitos de información sobre los peligros – etiquetado y ficha de datos de seguridad (2015)
  • Suecia, Región de Estocolmo: Lista de eliminación de productos químicos peligrosos para el medio ambiente y la salud humana (2012-2016, revisada para 2017-2021)

Premios especiales

  • Premio especial “Pesticidas altamente peligrosos”: Sri Lanka: Ley de Pesticidas nº 33 (1980, modificada en 1994, 2011, 2020) y Política Nacional y Plan de Acción para la Prevención del Suicidio (1997)
  • Premio especial “Plomo en la pintura”: Filipinas: Orden de control químico del plomo y los compuestos de plomo (CCO, 2013-24)
  • Premio especial “Contaminantes farmacéuticos ambientalmente persistentes”: Colombia: Resolución No. 371 Por la cual se establecen los elementos a considerar en los Planes de Gestión de Devolución de Productos Farmacéuticos y Medicamentos Vencidos (2009).

El 6 de julio de 2021, celebraremos las políticas ganadoras del Future Policy Award 2021 con una ceremonia de entrega de premios virtual de alto nivel. Inscríbase aquí: https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/fpa-2021-ceremony/ . Posteriormente, los ganadores serán reconocidos en el Foro de Berlín sobre Química y Sostenibilidad el 8 de julio de 2021.

El premio lo concede el World Future Council y se organiza este año en colaboración con el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA), el Enfoque Estratégico para la Gestión Internacional de los Productos Químicos (SAICM), la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), la Organización de Cooperación y Desarrollo Económicos (OCDE), el Instituto de las Naciones Unidas para la Formación y la Investigación (UNITAR) y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), y con el apoyo de la Fundación Michael Otto y la Fundación Jua.

“La falta de una gestión adecuada de los productos químicos que forman parte de la vida cotidiana está toxificando nuestro planeta y toda la vida en él. Es absolutamente imperativo reforzar la buena gobernanza de los productos químicos y los residuos, mediante leyes y políticas eficaces, inspiradoras e innovadoras, como las que representan los ganadores del Future Policy Award 2021. Establecen un ejemplo que esperamos que muchos gobiernos sigan”, afirma Inger Andersen, Directora Ejecutiva del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA).

Achim Steiner, Administrador del Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), añade: “Cada año entran en el mercado 1.500 nuevas sustancias químicas. Muchas de ellas nunca han sido sometidas a pruebas adecuadas de seguridad y toxicidad y pueden causar daños irreversibles a la salud de los seres humanos, la fauna, la flora y los ecosistemas”. Las políticas ganadoras del Future Policy Award 2021 de Colombia, Kirguistán, Filipinas, Sri Lanka y Suecia ofrecen soluciones impactantes que abordan aspectos críticos de este desafío global”

También es importante tener en cuenta la exposición a sustancias químicas peligrosas en el contexto laboral. Los trabajadores suelen estar expuestos a dosis más elevadas de sustancias químicas y durante períodos más largos, lo que aumenta los riesgos de sufrir efectos importantes sobre la salud. Se necesitan buenas políticas en el mundo del trabajo, y el Future Policy Award 2021 destaca ejemplos de cómo podemos seguir promoviendo la seguridad y la salud en el trabajo y la gestión racional de los productos químicos y residuos en todo el mundo. Guy Ryder, Director General de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), señala que “es nuestro deber reafirmar el derecho a un lugar de trabajo seguro y saludable para todos los trabajadores”[1].

A la hora de seleccionar a los ganadores entre los mejores candidatos, el jurado del Future Policy Award hace uso de un método único de análisis de políticas: los 7 Principios de Future-Just Lawmaking. Jakob von Uexkull, fundador del World Future Council, explica: “Revisamos a fondo cada política y nos planteamos preguntas críticas: Por ejemplo, ¿prevé la política una consulta pública y un verdadero compromiso en los procesos de redacción, aplicación, seguimiento y evaluación? Curiosamente, aunque hemos recibido nominaciones para casi todas las categorías del Future Policy Award de este año, no hemos recibido ninguna en la categoría de “Sustancias químicas en los productos”. Todavía queda mucho por hacer en este campo. Nos complace presentar ejemplos de políticas positivas en un panorama mundial y trabajaremos para promoverlas de modo que puedan inspirar acciones políticas más ambiciosas en otros países.”

 

Para más información, véase:

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

https://twitter.com/Good_Policies

[1]Congreso mundial sobre seguridad y salud en el trabajo 2017


ESTE PROYECTO CUENTA CON EL APOYO FINANCIERO DE:         

El editor es responsable del contenido de esta publicación.

Con el apoyo de la Fundación Michael Otto y la Fundación Jua.


Contacto para prensa y medios

Anna-Lara Stehn

Directora de Medios y Comunicación

World Future Council

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org

Nota a los editores

Acerca del Future Policy Award

Cada año, las políticas más impactantes que abordan los retos más urgentes de la humanidad se celebran a través del Future Policy Award, el primer y único premio que reconoce las políticas en beneficio de las generaciones presentes y futuras a nivel internacional. El objetivo del premio es sensibilizar a la opinión pública mundial sobre las políticas ejemplares y acelerar la acción política. El World Future Council concede este premio anual desde 2010 en colaboración con las agencias de la ONU y la UIP.

 

Acerca de las políticas ganadoras del Future Policy Award 2021

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/future-policy-award-2021-winning-policies

 

Acerca del World Future Council

El World Future Council (WFC) trabaja para legar a nuestros hijos y nietos un planeta sano y sostenible con sociedades justas y pacíficas. Para lograrlo, nos centramos en identificar, desarrollar, destacar y difundir soluciones eficaces y justas para el futuro para los retos actuales a los que se enfrenta la humanidad, y promovemos su aplicación en todo el mundo. El Consejo se compone de 50 eminentes agentes del cambio a nivel mundial procedentes de gobiernos, parlamentos, sociedades civiles, universidades, artes y el mundo empresarial. Jakob von Uexkull, el fundador del Premio Nobel Alternativo, lanzó el World Future Council en 2007. Somos una organización independiente y sin ánimo de lucro según la legislación alemana y financiamos nuestras actividades con asociaciones institucionales y donaciones.

Socios

 

Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) y el Enfoque Estratégico para la Gestión Internacional de los Productos Químicos (SAICM)

https://www.unep.org/

http://www.saicm.org/

Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT)

https://www.ilo.org/

 

Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económicos (OCDE)

https://www.oecd.org

Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD)

https://www.undp.org/

Instituto de las Naciones Unidas para la Formación Profesional y la Investigación (UNITAR)

https://unitar.org/

The post El Future Policy Award 2021 premia a las cinco mejores políticas de protección contra las sustancias químicas peligrosas appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award Winners announced

29. Juni 2021 - 1:01
Future Policy Award Winners announced: Future Policy Award 2021 crowns five best policies protecting from hazardous chemicals

Policies from Colombia, Kyrgyzstan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Sweden are this year’s winners of the Oscar for best policies

Geneva, Hamburg, Nairobi, Paris, 29th June 2021 – Five inspiring and impactful laws and policies take home the Future Policy Award 2021. The Award, often referred to as the Oscar on Best Polices, is celebrating the most effective policy solutions that minimise the adverse effects of exposure to chemicals on human health and the environment. Two Gold winners and three Special Award winners were selected from 55 nominated policies from 36 countries. This year’s winners are:

Gold Awards

  • Kyrgyzstan: Resolution No. 43 on Approval of the Chemical Hazard Classification System and Hazard Information Requirements – Labelling and Safety Data Sheet (2015)
  • Sweden, Region Stockholm: Phase-Out List for Chemicals Hazardous to the Environment and Human Health (2012-2016, revised for 2017-2021)

Special Awards

  • Special Award “Highly Hazardous Pesticides”: Sri Lanka: Control of Pesticides Act No. 33 (1980, amended in 1994, 2011, 2020) and National Policy and Action Plan on Prevention of Suicide (1997)
  • Special Award “Lead in Paint”: Philippines: Chemical Control Order for Lead and Lead Compounds (CCO, 2013-24)
  • Special Award “Environmentally Persistent Pharmaceutical Pollutants”: Colombia: Resolution No. 371 Establishing the elements to be considered in the Management Plans for the Return of Pharmaceutical Products and Expired Medicines (2009).

On 6th July 2021, we will celebrate the winning policies of the Future Policy Award 2021 with a high-level, virtual Award Ceremony. Register at https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/fpa-2021-ceremony/. Afterwards, the winners will be honoured at the Berlin Forum on Chemicals and Sustainability on 8th July 2021.

The prize is awarded by the World Future Council and is organised this year in partnership with the United Nation Environment Programme (UNEP), the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and with the support of the Michael Otto Foundation and the Jua Foundation.

“The lack of sound management of chemicals which are part and parcel of daily life is toxifying our planet and all life on it. It is absolutely imperative to strengthen good governance of chemicals and waste – through effective, inspiring, and innovative laws and policies, such as those represented by the winners of the Future Policy Award 2021. They set a precedent, which hopefully many governments will follow,” says Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Achim Steiner, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), adds “Every year, 1,500 new chemicals enter the market. Many of them have never been properly tested for safety and toxicity and may cause irreversible harm to the health of humans, fauna, flora and ecosystems. The Future Policy Award 2021 winning policies from Colombia, Kyrgyzstan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka and Sweden are all impactful solutions that tackle critical aspects of this global challenge”

It is also important to consider hazardous chemical exposures in the working environment. Workers tend to be exposed to higher doses of chemicals, and over longer periods, increasing their risk of significant health effects. Many work in the informal sector or in sectors where these substances are frequently used with few preventative measures, such as in agriculture or mining. Good policies in the world of work are needed, and the 2021 Future Policy Award winners provide examples of how we can continue to promote occupational safety and health and the sound management of chemicals and waste worldwide. Guy Ryder, Director-General of the International Labour Organization (ILO) has noted that “It is our duty to reaffirm the right to a safe working environment for all working people[1].”

When choosing the winners from the top candidates, the Future Policy Award jury is guided by a unique approach to policy analysis: the 7 Principles of Future-Just Lawmaking. Jakob von Uexkull, Founder of the World Future Council, explains: “We thoroughly review each policy and ask critical questions: For instance, does the policy provide for public consultation and genuine engagement in the drafting, implementation, monitoring and evaluation processes? Interestingly, while we received nominations for almost all categories of this years’ Future Policy Award, we received none in the category of ‘Chemicals in products’. Much still needs to be done in this field. We are glad to present positive policy examples on a world stage and will work to promote them so they can inspire more ambitious policy action in other countries.”

For more information, please visit

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/hazardous-chemicals

[1]World Congress on Safety and Health at Work 2017



MEDIA CONTACT

Anna-Lara Stehn

Media & Communications Manager

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org



This project is financially supported by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and the German Environment Agency (UBA):

The publisher is responsible for the content of this publication.

With the support of the Michael Otto Foundation and the Jua Foundation.


Note to Editors

About the Future Policy Award

Every year, the most impactful policies tackling humankind’s most pressing challenges are celebrated through the Future Policy Award, the first and only award that recognizes policies for the benefit of present and future generations on an international level. The aim of the Award is to raise global awareness for exemplary policies and speed up policy action. The World Future Council has awarded this annual prize since 2010 in partnership with UN agencies and the IPU.

 

About the winning policies for the Future Policy Award 2021

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

 

About the World Future Council

The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying, developing, highlighting, and spreading effective, future-just solutions for current challenges humanity is facing, and promote their implementation worldwide. The Council consists of 50 eminent global change-makers from governments, parliaments, civil societies, academia, the arts, and the business world. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organisation under German law and finance our activities with institutional partnerships and donations.

Partners

 About the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) & the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM)

https://www.unep.org/

http://www.saicm.org/

About the International Labour Organisation (ILO)

https://www.ilo.org/

About the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

https://www.oecd.org

About the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

https://www.undp.org/

About the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)

https://unitar.org

The post Future Policy Award Winners announced appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Energy Democracy – Power to the People!

25. Juni 2021 - 16:08

By now the environmental advantages of a shift towards renewable energy have been widely recognised. A transition to renewable sources of energy is more sustainable, mitigates the impacts of climate change and can be a driving force for economic development. However, this transition does not only mean a change in the resources of energy. More significantly, it provides the opportunity for structural change and the redistribution of (economic) power. It enables participation and ownership for less privileged parts of the population. The concept behind this grander restructuring is called Energy Democracy.

What does Energy Democracy mean?

According to the Climate Justice Alliance‘ definition: „Energy Democracy represents a shift from the corporate, centralized fossil fuel economy to one that is governed by communities, is designed on the principle of no harm to the environment, supports local economies, and contributes to the health and well-being for all peoples.“ Thus it connects the transition to renewable energy with a process of democratisation, focusing on social benefits and their fair distribution and not on economic advantages for a few[i].

Energy democracy includes several basic principles, that can be translated into actions:

  • Transition to renewable, sustainable, and local sources of energy replacing fossil fuels. The foundation for the development of energy democracy is the transition from unsustainable, often centralised sources of energy to renewable energy which are modular and can be deployed even in the most remote regions.
  • Universal access to affordable and clean energy, so that everyone has the opportunity to use renewable energy as they wish. This can lead to local economic value creation, because small and medium sized enterprises can form or grow, due to their reliable access to energy. Further, the deployment of decentralised RE systems often leads to a reduction of the energy bill, as costly kerosene for lamps does not need to be acquired anymore.
  • Ownership of the energy transition and the decision-making processes connected to it. The people using the energy should be an active part of the decision-making process on how to foster and distribute it. They should decide on the transition to renewables and how to go through with it, ultimately also benefiting from financial returns.
  • A just transition that includes the restructuring of the energy system into one that benefits the people. Just transition means particularly the redistribution of power and wealth within the energy system.

The multi-faceted concept of energy democracy aspires to transform societies by democratizing the way in which power is produced and consumed. The movement, therefore, combines the social struggle for a more democratic and inclusive society – in which everyone can afford energy, has access to decent work and a say in how communities are governed – with the necessary transition to renewable energies that contribute to a safer environment for people and life around the globe. Therefore, it addresses both the issue of fossil fuels and their detrimental impact on our environment. As well as the fact that the current energy system is mostly controlled by corporations and serves economic interests of a few, often disregarding the needs and safety of people [ii][iii][iv].

Energy democracy is closely connected to the idea of community energy. The essence of both concepts is the participation and ownership of the local population in the energy system. Ideally, they decide what kind of energy they want to produce, in what way and how to distribute it. This also enables them to make decisions over spending of financial returns which could, for instance, be used to install further energy projects or maintain streets. The production and distribution of energy become democratic and fair with the interests of the local population at heart, hence contributing to local value creation. Consequently, communities are able to develop a sense of ownership in the energy transition[v]. The modularity of most renewable energy sources further supports this development, by being able to be installed even in the most remote regions, and often the transition to renewable energies goes hand in a hand with the democratisation of the energy system.

(Read about the example of solar home systems here: What are Solar Home Systems? (worldfuturecouncil.org))

Challenges for energy democracy around the globe and how to overcome them

Often communities are met with little support from governing authorities and face many risks when starting the process towards renewable energy and energy democracy[i]. Thus, challenges for energy democracy and active participation of community actors remain manifold: The difficulty of allocating financial means; navigating within a policy framework that is designed for large-scale, centralized projects; lack of understanding around the advantages of energy democracy and community energy.[ii]

However, there are many different communities advocating for a shift to renewable energy and greater participation in the energy transition.

There exist countless examples, showing us that energy democracy and a Just Transition to renewable energy is possible; for instance in the communities of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil, where social organisations have implemented concepts of energy community and whole neighbourhoods are now supplied with energy from solar panels installed on the roofs of their houses.; or in the rural areas of Bangladesh where villages that were previously not connected to the national electricity grid are now producing their own energy through solar home systems.

Energy democracy presents itself as a bottom-up approach with strong local actors and solutions that arise from within the community. In order to strengthen energy democracy and overcome the challenges for people to get engaged in the energy system, we need strong policy frameworks supporting people’s participation and rapid deployment of renewables. This can be achieved through various political and technological support measures, for instance, local ownership quotas, virtual net energy metering, Feed-In-Tariffs (FiTs) or One-Stop-Shops. To further allocate financial resources innovative financing mechanisms are necessary though. Those could be crowdfunding, concessional loans or grants which can help to reduce (perceived) risks with financing RE projects. Both should be coming from public sources of financing as well as from private sources.

Moreover, to create greater motivation for the establishment of energy democracy and community energy, better awareness for the benefits of community owned energy systems needs to be achieved.  For example, achieving universal energy access, the creation of green jobs, gender equity, access to education and local economic development. Incentives for storage need to be created. Overall, a stronger focus on distributed energy systems, rather than centralised systems is essential and should be apparent through measures such as FiTs, premiums, as well as ambitious targets for renewable energy.

Realising the opportunity of a transition to renewable energy as a chance for structural change in the energy system and a just transition, is essential. The World Future Council (WFC) is currently working with legislators and parliamentarians, particularly from countries of the Global South, to support this process. Specifically, to encourage the development of policy frameworks that provide better support for communities in their transition and help them tackle the challenges that they are facing.

Read Here about the projects of the WFC:

Global Renewables Congress – Legislators for Renewable Energy

Climate and Energy – World Future Council 

You might also like:

What is just transition? And what does it mean for the energy sector? (worldfuturecouncil.org)

What are Solar Home Systems? (worldfuturecouncil.org)

https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/community-energy-rio-de-janeiro/
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/lessons-learned-100-re/
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/climate-change-poverty-energy-renewable-energy-solution-africa/
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/women-forefront-energy-revolution/
https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/100re-sdg/

Sources:

i Energy Democracy – Climate Justice Alliance
ii Climate justice and energy – Friends of the Earth International (foei.org)

iii What is energy democracy? – The Earthbound Report
iv PRINCIPLES OF ENERGY DEMOCRACY | ENERGY DEMOCRACY (energy-democracy.net)
v Definition, benefits and potential of community energy | Community Energy England

vi IRENA Coalition for Action, 2020
vii IRENA Coalition for Action, 2020

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Farm Okukuna: World Future Council hands over to the City of Windhoek

25. Juni 2021 - 12:31
Farm Okukuna: World Future Council hands over to the City of Windhoek

Windhoek, 25th June 2021 – Growing food in Windhoek is not easy. At Farm Okukuna, in Windhoek’s informal settlement Goreangab, a number of organisations have been running programmes to grow food and create local income opportunities. The City of Windhoek has now taken over and asked partners to refrain from further activities.
“A project so successful that it is taken over by local stakeholders – this is what one wants to achieve as a donor,” says Ina Wilkie, Senior Project Manager of the World Future Council. “We wish the City of Windhoek all the very best in continuing the work.”

Over the past three years, a wide range of programmes has taken place at Farm Okukuna. Ina Wilkie of the World Future Council had taken the lead, also raising third-party funding from the German Liselotte Foundation and the UK Waterloo Foundation as well as the Southern African Innovation Support Fund (SAIS). What started as a Permaculture community garden three years ago is now an established project.

Community members have founded a Voluntary Association to manage processes and income on the farm. 16 members tend to their individual gardens, producing food for their families and for sale. The process was accompanied by many facilitated discussions, training and investments into tools and infrastructure. “My garden is really important to me,” says Auguste Kankono, resident of Goreangab. “It provides me with income and keeps me away from the location. I wake up early to come here and look after my garden. My whole family is excited and my neighbours are ordering vegetables from me.”

Compost, seedlings and natural pest repellents are produced at the Farm Okukuna product centre. The partners procure the materials and support with marketing. The products, however, belong to the producers who are people from the community. Every team member decides how much work they put in and therefore how much money they earn.
The products are developed together with local experts. The Okukuna SPICE compost, for example, a brainchild of facilitator Wiebke Volkmann, has already acquired some fame on the local market. It contains more carbon and nitrogen than other composts. It combines bacterial and fungal decomposition through an initial aerobic process which generates heat for killing weed seeds and pathogens, followed by low oxygen fermentation that breaks down material faster. Farm Okukuna compost is sold through retail outlets such as Agrigro and at the Green Market in Klein Windhoek on Saturdays. Monthly Open Days at Farm Okukuna have also been an opportunity for sales and income generation.
“Compost production does not only provide me with income but also with knowledge and experience,” Halleluja Ruusa Inane, resident of Goreangab explains. “We really hope that we can continue.”

From the beginning, the Training Centre has been an integral part of Farm Okukuna. It had a focus on Permaculture which is a way to grow food and organise your life with minimal external inputs and therefore ideal for people with little money. Trainings were facilitated by the Namibian Eloolo Perma-culture Initiative and South African Permaculture Activists.
A Masterclass Programme gave a local agriculture graduate the opportunity to gain further qualification. “As an agriculture graduate, it is difficult to find a job. Most employers look for people with experience. It was fabulous for me to work here and get the opportunity to learn about planting and designing. Permaculture really opened my eyes,” explains Simon Indila, the Masterclass Student, resident of Goreangab. “We are doing something here that is really needed in the nation.”

Farm Okukuna was also an implementation site of the “Living Permaculture” Project, funded by the Southern African Innovation Support Fund (SAIS). In this 18-month project, shack dwellers designed solutions that could help make their life easier: a pit bed that uses grey-water from the bucket shower for growing food, shack insulation from cardboard that cools in summer and warms in winter, a compost bag to produce your own fertiliser, a simple grey-water filter made of two buckets and more.

“We are definitely planning to continue this work,” Ina Wilkie of the World Future Council stresses. The organisation is currently developing a new project and reaching out to potential partners and hosts. “Our two paid staff must not worry. We do not want anyone to lose their job in these times. Smart solutions for shack dwellers are needed now more than ever and we are looking forward to setting up a new project in Namibia.”

Farm Okukuna was started in 2018 as a project of three partners. The World Future Council, funded by the Liselotte Foundation, was responsible for management and fundraising. The Eloolo Permaculture Initiative facilitated training. The City of Windhoek, who owns the land, acted as a landlord, providing the land, security and water.
About the World Future Council

The World Future Council works to pass on a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, the organisation focusses on identifying, developing, highlighting, and spreading effective, future-just solutions for current challenges humanity is facing, and promotes their implementation worldwide. The Council consists of 50 eminent global change-makers from governments, parliaments, civil societies, academia, the arts, and the business world. The World Future Council is an independent, non-profit organisation under German law and finances activities with institutional partnerships and donations.

The programme ‘The Rights of Children and Youth’ works to ensure that the rights of girls, boys and young people are upheld and supported so that they may reach their full potential. The team covers the topics of child protection, education for sustainable development, youth empowerment. The programme champions Zanzibar’s comprehensive Children’s Act and works with the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Welfare in Ghana on setting-up so called One-Stop-Centres based on the Zanzibar model. One-Stop-Centres are central contact points for children and their families affected by violence.

The World Future Council’s programme on ‘Climate and Energy’ assists countries in developing roadmaps for 100% renewable energy and has especially been working with government representatives and partners in Tanzania, Bangladesh, Costa Rica and Morocco on such roadmaps.

Contact
Ina Wilkie
Senior Project Manager, World Future Council
ina@worldfuturecouncil.org
Phone: +264 81 2443981
www.worldfuturecouncil.org
facebook: GrowingFoodinWindhoek

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Event information: Berlin Forum on Chemicals and Sustainability

18. Juni 2021 - 12:17

Event information

Berlin Forum on Chemicals and Sustainability

We invite you to join the event of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety

Berlin Forum on Chemicals and Sustainability – Ambition & Action Towards 2030

Federal Environment Minister Svenja Schulze will be holding the Berlin Forum on Chemicals and Sustainability on 7 and 8 July 2021. At this virtual conference, representatives from governments, international organisations, businesses and civil society groups will talk about structuring the future of global chemicals and waste management to cope with the challenges posed by rapidly growing production and use of chemicals and the associated risks for human health and the environment.

The Berlin Forum will start on 7 July 2021 with a high-level ministerial dialogue with statements from UN Secretary-General António Guterres and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The Berlin Forum will continue with the stakeholder dialogue on 8 July 2021.

You will find a detailed programme and the link for registration here.

Registration

More information here

https://www.bmu.de/en/event/berlin-forum-on-chemicals-and-sustainability/

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Press Release: Presidents Biden and Putin urged to adopt nuclear no-first-use policies

16. Juni 2021 - 17:29
Press Release: Presidents Biden and Putin urged to adopt nuclear no-first-use policies

June 15, 2121

In an Open Letter to US President Joseph Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin, sent prior to their June 16 Summit in Geneva, Switzerland, the two leaders are urged to use the opportunity of their meeting to reduce tensions between the two countries and lower the risks of a nuclear exchange, in particular by making a “joint commitment that their nations will not use nuclear weapons first under any circumstances, and to make this a key step toward fulfilling the United Nations goal to totally eliminate nuclear weapons from the planet.”

 

“Presidents Biden and Putin are meeting as the world continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic and the accelerating impacts of the climate crisis,” says Maria Fernanda Espinosa, Member of the World Future Council and former President of the UN General Assembly (2019-2020). “Rather than sticking to outdated, adversarial and highly risky nuclear weapons postures, the US and Russia can demonstrate real leadership by committing to a mutual No First Use pact, which would greatly enhance global security, pave the way for ridding the world of nuclear weapons and create the conditions for tackling other existential threats.”

 

The Open Letter arose from a meeting on 26-27 May 2021 of No First Use Global, a new international campaign advocating a commitment by nuclear-armed and allied states to a policy of no first use of nuclear weapons. The letter, which has also been sent to all other nuclear-armed and allied states, has been endorsed by over 1100 political, military and religious leaders, as well as legislators, academics and scientists and other representatives of civil society.

“If all nuclear armed countries stick to a commitment not to be the first to use nuclear weapons, a nuclear war cannot break out,” says Carlo Trezza, Former Italian Ambassador for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation and one of the drafters of the Open Letter.

“It’s almost thirty-six years after US President Reagan and Soviet leader Gorbachev agreed that A nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought, says John Hallam, Director of People for Nuclear Disarmament (Australia) and co-convenor of the Abolition 2000 working group on nuclear risk reduction. “Yet the threat of nuclear war still looms large. In large part this is due to military doctrines currently in place in many of the nuclear-armed states, which don’t rule out using nuclear weapons first, including in response to a range of non-nuclear threats.

“In the case of the United States and Russia, these risks are compounded by the fact that each side maintains hundreds of warheads ready to be launched at a moment’s notice” says Peter Metz, from Massachusetts Peace Action, USA. “A move towards adoption of a mutual policy committing to never initiate a nuclear attack, i.e. No First Use, by the two nations with the largest nuclear stockpiles would be a critically important step towards achieving a world free of nuclear weapons—a goal enshrined in the very first resolution of the UN General Assembly.”

“Such a move would be supported by most of the other 189 States Parties of the Non-Proliferation Treaty who unanimously agreed in 2010 to support ‘policies that could prevent the use of nuclear weapons’ and ‘to establish the necessary framework to achieve and maintain a world without nuclear weapons’”, says Aaron Tovish, Director of Zona Libre in Mexico, former Program Director of Parliamentarians for Global Action and former Vision 2020 Campaign Director for Mayors for Peace. “It will most likely also be strongly supported by the 122 nations that in 2017 approved the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons as a measure toward achieving a nuclear-weapon-free world.”

Amongst the endorsers of the Open Letter are UN Messengers for Peace Michael Douglas and Jane Goodall; public visionary Deepak Chopra; two former UN Under-Secretary Generals for Disarmament Sergio Duarte and Nobuyasu Abe; Nobel Peace Laureate Mairead Maguire; former US Secretary of Defense William Perry, former Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson; and a number of former foreign and defense ministers, generals, UN ambassadors and other officials of nuclear armed and allied countries as well as from non-nuclear countries.

Click here for the list of all endorsers. See below for quotes from some of the endorsers.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Quotes from some of the endorsers:

“The leaders of the United States and the Russian Federation, countries which possess over 90% of the world’s nuclear weapons, bear special responsibility to ensure that these devastating weapons are never used. Reciprocal adoption of a No-First Use policy will reduce nuclear risk and facilitate nuclear disarmament. Presidents Biden and Putin need to demonstrate leadership regarding nuclear dangers in keeping with that displayed by Presidents Reagan and Gorbachev in the past.”
Paul Meyer, Chair of Pugwash Canada Group

“If a pledge of NFU of nuclear weapons is accepted by all nuclear weapons states it can produce a revolutionary turn initially leading to the erosion of nuclear weapons and finally to the complete elimination of  such weapons of mass destruction  from our planet for the benefits of all its inhabitants and the international security at large.”

Vladimir P. Kozin, Member, Russian Academies of Military Sciences and Natural Sciences (Moscow)

“The U.S. and Russia possess and deploy the lion’s share of nuclear weapons in the world.  These two nuclear superpowers can therefore reduce the risk of a nuclear war that could destroy all life on earth.  As a U.S. citizen, I particularly call upon my own government to lower global tensions, to implement a No First Use policy, and to help lead a global process to eliminate all nuclear weapons.”

Gerry Condon, Former president, Veterans For Peace, USA

“It would give great hope to the people of the whole world and release their fear and anxiety if you both Mr Presidents took the first steps towards nuclear disarmament by declaring ‘No first strike ‘ and a programme together of co-operation and disarmament for the world. God bless you both.”

Mairead Maguire, Nobel Peace Laureate 1976, Northern Ireland

“No-First-Use — at least try or be fully accountable to humanity’s destruction.”
Ambassador Libran Nuevas Cabactulan, Philippines
President of the 2010 NPT Review Conference. Former Permanent Representative of the Philippines to the United Nations in New York.

“Remember your humanity, forget the rest. An explicit no-first use of nuclear weapons policy is the first step. Don’t wait for disaster to happen on your watch. Declare it together and follow up by de-escalating your states’ nuclear weapons.”
Joelien Pretorius, Pugwash South Africa branch, University of the Western Cape, South Africa

“San Francisco Bay Physicians for Social Responsibility, representing hundreds of physicians and other health professionals, strongly supports a global commitment to “no first use” of nuclear weapons a key step towards our goal of abolishing nuclear weapons in line with the UN Treaty to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons.”
Dr Robert M. Gould, MD, San Francisco Bay Physicians for Social Responsibility

“A no first use policy means that the United States commits itself to never starting a nuclear war and never considering using nuclear weapons except in response to a confirmed nuclear attack.  The real question, therefore, is not whether the USA will adopt a no first use policy, but how President Biden can possibly justify it not doing so?

Peggy Mason, President of The Rideau Institute. Former Canadian Disarmament Ambassador

“Located twenty miles from one of the highest concentrations of nuclear weapons in the world, the Church Council continues to support No First Use of nuclear weapons, as we have for more than three decades.  Any use would be catastrophic to human and all life and we commit to life and to creation in ending the proliferation of and threat posed by nuclear weapons.”

Michael Ramos, Church Council of Greater Seattle

 “Destruction of a section of humanity and a part of our planet is the most diabolical and inhumane act that humankind can ever visualise. A nation, a country or person on behalf of that nation or country that takes the initiative to use the Atom Bomb can never justify such an act of sheer satanic vengeance. It is totally against the teachings of all our scriptures and our deep sense of propriety. We therefore implore that all countries of the world sign a treaty of no first use of this destructive weapon.“

Ela Gandhi, Gandhi Development Trust/Phoenix Settlement Trust; Honorary Co-President of Religions for Peace

“IPPNW Canada asks Presidents Biden and Putin to remember their humanity and pledge No First Use of nuclear weapons.”
Dr Jonathan Down, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War Canada

“Yes, it is very important for the world to see that US and Russia sign for no first use of Nuclear Weapons at this meet of the leaders on 16th June 2021 in Switzerland.”

Kanaka Kumar Chand Kolavennu, Rotary Action Group for Peace, India

“We call for the abolition of nuclear weapons. We demand the no-first use of nuclear weapons to reduce the risk even a little.”
ADACHI Shuichi, Hiroshima Alliance for Nuclear Weapons Abolition (HANWA)

“No first use is the first step to abolition nuclear weapons.”
Juan Gomez, Movimiento por un mundo sin guerras y sin violencia, Chile

“A commitment not to be the first to use nuclear weapons under any circumstances as a step to a world without such weapons would be a powerful tool to achieve that goal.”    

Ambassador Sergio Duarte, President of Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs

“A no first use declaration is a logical step towards nuclear disarmament. In a world of growing tensions, we appeal to the presidents of two nuclear superpowers to take this necessary step.”
Stefan Nieuwinckel, Pax Christi Vlaanderen, Belgium

“As Presidents Biden and Putin prepare to meet in Switzerland for their first Summit, we urge them to discuss a No First Use policy, committing to one another, and the world, that they will never initiate a nuclear weapons attack. Both leaders have expressed throughout their political careers their grave concerns regarding the risk of nuclear weapons to the world’s population. As the Biden administration gets to work on their Nuclear Posture Review, adopting a No First Use policy would send an important message that he will continue progress made during the Obama administration towards a world without nuclear weapons. We urge President Biden to use this opportunity to set a progressive vision for U.S. nuclear weapons policy, one emphasizing peace and international cooperation, and aiming towards disarmament as a long-term goal.”

Mac Hamilton, Women’s Action for New Directions, USA

“Japan Congress Against A-and H-Bombs (GENSUIKIN) has demanded Nuclear Weapons States to adopt No-First-Use Policy. Thus, we endorse the Open Letter. Meanwhile, though Japan is the only country to have suffered atomic bombings during the war, Japanese government opposes to adopt the policy by US government, arguing that it would weaken nuclear deterrence of the US. We continue to make efforts to change stand of the Japanese government.”
Tomoyuki Kitamura, Takashi Kikuchi, Japan Congress Against A-and H-Bombs (GENSUIKIN)

“The World is looking to President Biden and President Putin to lead by example in endorsing ‘No First Use’ and thereby to write your names into Global History.”

Bill Kidd MSP, PNND Co-President, Scotland

“I have sat under two H-Bombs. Lots of us have died early from radiation-like illnesses. They are terrifying weapons and if not banned soon they will destroy our beautiful planet.”

Gordon Frederick Coggon, Nuclear test veteran Christmas Island 1957-1958, UK.

“If presidents Biden and Putin wish to demonstrate world leadership for history, without risking to be outmaneuvered by other nuclear powers, they could commit to a no first use pact to enter into effect in one year, provided the other nuclear powers join the pact.” 

Bishop Gunnar Stålsett, Hon. President Religions for Peace. Former Vice Chair Nobel Peace Prize Committee, Norway.

“Nuclear weapons are a complete contradiction to the values of peacemaking, reconciliation and justice, love and compassion, which are at the heart of the gospel. As a community, we believe that the production, possession, use or threatened use of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction is theologically and morally indefensible and that opposition to their existence is an imperative of the Christian faith.”
Heinz Töller, The Iona Community, UK

“As a U. S. Marine Corp Veterans with 22 months in Vietnam along the DMZ I saw the human carnage visited upon the Vietnamese people and our young misguided American Patriots. I can only imagine a the madness of a Nuclear Holocaust with 1st Strike by my country and the world wide calamity and horror that will befall all on humankind and those who might live are living in a Hell on Earth Nuclear Winter Wasteland. When will our collective madness end? Now is the time.”

Jan A. Ruhman, Veterans For Peace, President, San Diego Chapter 91

“A joint US-Russian pledge to reject first use of nuclear weapons would add to the Indian-Chinese no first use pledge, greatly reduce world tensions, and buy badly needed time for serious steps towards nuclear disarmament. It is an essential step forward.”

John Roby, New Hampshire Peace Action

“During the Caribbean Crisis in 1961 I witnessed the world coming to a brink of a nuclear disaster, but was saved only incidentally by the restrained actions of a captain of a Soviet submarine. I and my family are urging you, President Biden and President Putin, to sign a new plan for a nuclear disarmament during your first summit on June 16.”
Anatol Zukerman, Newton Dialogues for Peace

“Nuclear weapons are one of the biggest threats against human security. The women network G100 Security and Defence Wing strongly support this no-first-use appeal.”

Bodil Valero, G100 Security and Defence Wing

“Now is the right time. Omnicide is close at hand if these measures are not taken.”

Lynn Sableman, Branch President of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, St. Louis, USA

Media Contact

Anna Stehn
Media & Communications Manager
World Future Council
anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org
Phone: +49 (0) 1703813807

John Hallam GMT+10 (Sydney, Australia),
johnhallam2011@yahoo.com.au
Phone: +61 411 854612

Peter Metz EDT (Massachusetts, USA),
pmetz@alum.mit.edu.
Phone: +1-617-407-2023

Rob van Riet GMT+1 (London, UK),
robvanriet@gmail.com.
Phone: +44 7983 265979

Aaron Tovish Central Time (Mexico City),
aaron.tovish@gmail.com.
Phone: +52 55 7354 9173

About the World Future Council
The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying, developing, highlighting, and spreading effective, future-just solutions for current challenges humanity is facing, and promote their implementation worldwide. The Council consists of 50 eminent global change-makers from governments, parliaments, civil societies, academia, the arts, and the business world. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organisation under German law and finance our activities with institutional partnerships and donations.

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Sélection finale pour le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir (Future Policy Award) sur la protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux

8. Juni 2021 - 13:26
Sélection finale pour le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir (Future Policy Award) sur la protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux

La Colombie, la Corée, Cuba, le Danemark, les États-Unis, l’Éthiopie, l’Inde, le Kirghizistan, les Pays-Bas, les Philippines, Sri Lanka et la Suède sont en lice pour l’« Oscar » de l’action publique.

Genève, Hambourg, Nairobi, Paris, 27 mai 2021 – La liste des initiatives qui restent en lice pour le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir a été annoncée ce jour. Ce prix récompense les initiatives publiques qui ont le mieux réussi à réduire au minimum les effets néfastes de l’exposition aux produits chimiques sur la santé humaine et l’environnement. La sélection finale compte 12 initiatives engagées sur l’un des cinq continents.

Cette sélection a été établie par un jury international d’experts chargé de délibérer sur les meilleures des 55 initiatives de 36 pays initialement retenues. Ce prix annuel, surnommé l’« Oscar des meilleures politiques », est actuellement le seul qui récompense, à l’échelle internationale, les politiques mises en œuvre pour le bénéfice des générations présentes et futures. La sélection finale de cette année est la suivante (par catégorie) :

Gestion des produits chimiques tout au long de leur cycle de vie

  • Inde (Rajasthan): action contre les pneumoconioses, dont la silicose : détection, prévention, traitement et réadaptation (2019)
  • Kirghizistan: résolution n° 43 portant approbation du Système de classification des dangers chimiques et des exigences d’information concernant les dangers – Étiquetage et fiche de données de sécurité (2015)
  • République de Corée: Loi relative à la sécurité des produits chimiques et biocides de consommation (2018)
  • Suède (Conseil du comté de Stockholm): Liste des substances chimiques dangereuses pour l’environnement et la santé humaine devant faire l’objet d’une élimination progressive (2012-16, révisée pour la période 2017-21)
  • États-Unis (Massachusetts): Loi relative à la réduction de l’utilisation des produits toxiques (loi TURA de 1989, modifiée en 2006)

Pesticides très dangereux

  • Cuba: Programme de gestion agroécologique des organismes nuisibles (1993) et Plan national de sécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle (2020)
  • Danemark: plans d’action contre les pesticides (2013-21) et plans d’action en faveur de la production agricole biologique (2011-20)
  • Sri Lanka: Loi n° 33 sur les pesticides (1980, modifiée en 1994, 2011 et 2020) et

Politique nationale et plan d’action national de prévention du suicide (1997)

Peintures au plomb

  • Éthiopie: Règlement n° 429 relatif au contrôle de la présence de plomb dans les peintures (2018)
  • Philippines: décret relatif à la vérification chimique applicable au plomb et à ses composés (2013-24)

Polluants pharmaceutiques persistants

  • Colombie: résolution n° 371 portant définition des éléments à prendre en considération dans les plans de gestion des retours de produits pharmaceutiques et de médicaments périmés (2009)
  • Pays-Bas: Programme de mise en œuvre d’une approche de la réduction des résidus pharmaceutiques dans l’eau impliquant tous les acteurs de la chaîne (2018-22)

Les lauréats de l’édition 2021 seront connus début juillet 2021 et la remise des prix aura lieu le 6 juillet 2021 à l’occasion d’une cérémonie à distance.

Le World Future Council (WFC) organise et décerne ce prix chaque année en partenariat avec le Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE), l’Approche stratégique de la gestion internationale des produits chimiques (SAICM), l’Organisation mondiale du Travail (OIT), l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE), l’Institut des Nations Unies pour la formation et la recherche (UNITAR) et le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD).

Selon les estimations de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé, l’exposition à certains produits chimiques a coûté la vie à 1.6 million de personnes en 2016[1]. On s’inquiète de plus en plus des effets que l’exposition aux substances chimiques et déchets dangereux produit sur la santé à long terme, notamment sous différentes formes de cancer, de trouble de la reproduction et de difficulté d’apprentissage[2].  Le coût des déficits neurocomportementaux causés par l’exposition à certaines substances chimiques est estimé à plus de 170 milliards USD par an, rien que dans l’Union européenne[3].

Plus de 140 000 produits chimiques seraient fabriqués par l’homme dans le monde[4]. Si beaucoup sont commercialisés, peu ont fait l’objet d’essais appropriés destinés à en vérifier l’innocuité. Le problème vient surtout des substances chimiques qui finissent dans l’environnement (dans les masses d’eau, le sol ou l’air), dans la chaîne alimentaire ou dans l’eau potable, ou qui s’accumulent dans nos corps et d’autres organismes. Les produits chimiques dangereux, tels que les polychlorobiphényles (PCB), les phtalates, les métaux lourds comme le plomb, les pesticides et les polluants pharmaceutiques persistants, peuvent occasionner des dommages irréversibles à la santé humaine, à la faune, à la flore et aux écosystèmes.

Pour Masamichi Kono, Secrétaire général adjoint de l’OCDE, « la gestion irrationnelle des produits chimiques et des déchets a un coût économique exorbitant. Il est urgent d’agir sur le plan réglementaire pour ne pas gaspiller l’argent des contribuables mais aussi pour protéger notre santé et les ressources environnementales essentielles, surtout si l’on considère qu’une croissance de l’industrie chimique est attendue. Pour faire cesser les atteintes à la santé et à l’environnement et évoluer vers une chimie durable, nous avons besoin de politiques ambitieuses qui changent la donne, à l’image de celles sélectionnées pour le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir. »

« Les substances chimiques posent des difficultés complexes », souligne Nikhil Seth, Sous-Secrétaire général et Directeur exécutif de l’Institut des Nations Unies pour la formation et la recherche (UNITAR). « Leur gestion est une question transversale de l’Agenda 2030. La sécurité des produits chimiques et la gestion des substances toxiques concernent un grand nombre, sinon la totalité, des Objectifs de développement durable. J’applaudis vivement aux initiatives sélectionnées pour le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir car elles traduisent en action concrètes ce qui relève d’un problème fondamental. »

Il importe également de prendre en considération l’exposition aux substances chimiques dangereuses dans le milieu professionnel. Il n’est pas rare que les travailleurs soient exposés à des doses plus élevées sur des périodes plus longues, risquant ainsi davantage à en subir gravement les effets sanitaires. Alors que le monde du travail a besoin de politiques judicieuses, le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir met en exergue des exemples de moyens d’améliorer la sécurité et la santé au travail et de promouvoir une gestion rationnelle des produits chimiques et des déchets dans le monde entier.

De l’avis du Directeur général de l’Organisation internationale du Travail (OIT), Guy Ryder, « il est de notre devoir de réaffirmer que chacun a le droit de travailler dans un environnement sûr et sain ».

« Tous les jours, nos droits sont bafoués du fait de l’exposition à des substances chimiques toxiques et à la pollution. Les enfants en pâtissent de façon disproportionnée », rappelle Alexandra Wandel, Directrice exécutive du World Future Council. « Pour les générations actuelles et futures, il est absolument essentiel que les parties prenantes élèvent au rang de priorité la protection contre les substances chimiques dangereuses. Nous avons hâte de porter sur la scène internationale les moyens d’action publique efficaces dans ce domaine. »

 

Ce projet bénéficie du concours financiers de :   

Le contenu de la présente publication relève de la responsabilité de l’éditeur.

Avec le soutien de la Fondation Michael Otto et de la Fondation Jua.

 

Contact médias

Anna-Lara Stehn

Responsable Médias et Communication

World Future Council

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org

+49 (0) 170 38 138 07

Note aux éditeurs

À propos du Prix de l’action d’avenir

Chaque année, le Prix de l’action d’avenir est attribué aux initiatives les plus efficaces face aux principaux impératifs de l’humanité. Il est actuellement le seul qui récompense, à l’échelle internationale, les politiques mises en œuvre pour le bénéfice des générations présentes et futures. L’objectif est de mieux faire connaître les politiques exemplaires à travers le monde et d’accélérer l’action publique. Le World Future Council décerne ce prix annuel depuis 2010 en partenariat avec les institutions des Nations Unies et l’UIP.

À propos des politiques sélectionnées pour le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/future-policy-award-2021-about-the-shortlisted-policies 

 

À propos du World Future Council

Le World Future Council (WFC) s’est donné pour mission de transmettre à nos enfants et petits-enfants une planète saine et viable ainsi que des sociétés vivant dans la justice et la paix. Pour ce faire, il s’emploie à recenser, à étoffer, à mettre en avant et à diffuser des moyens efficaces et à terme équitables de venir à bout des problèmes qui assaillent aujourd’hui l’humanité, de même qu’il promeut leur mise en œuvre dans le monde entier. Il réunit 50 acteurs du changement de renommée mondiale issus des sphères administrative et parlementaire, de la société civile, du monde de l’université, des arts et des affaires. Lancé en 2007 par Jakob von Uexkull, le fondateur du « Prix Nobel alternatif », le WFC est une fondation indépendante à but non lucratif de droit allemand, qui finance ses activités grâce aux partenariats institutionnels et aux dons.

Partenaires

 

À propos du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE) et de l’Approche stratégique de la gestion internationale des produits chimiques (SAICM)

https://www.unep.org/

http://www.saicm.org/

À propos de l’Organisation internationale du Travail

https://www.ilo.org/

À propos de l’OCDE

https://www.oecd.org

À propos du PNUD

https://www.undp.org/

À propos de l’UNITAR

https://unitar.org/

—-

[1] OMS (2016). Public health impact of chemicals: knowns and unknowns. https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-FWC-PHE-EPE-16.01-eng.

[2] OMS. Providing information on the health effect of chemicals. https://www.who.int/activities/providing-information-on-the-health-effects-of-chemicals.

[3] PNUE (2019). Global Chemicals Outlook II Summary for Policymakers: From Legacies to Innovative Solutions-Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. https://www.unep.org/resources/report/global-chemicals-outlook-ii-legacies-innovative-solutions.

[4] Landrigan, P.J. & Fuller, R. (2018). The Impact of Pollution on Planetary Health: Emergence of an Underappreciated Risk Factor. UNEP: Perspectives; Issue No. 29. https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/22416/Perspective_No_29_web.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

The post Sélection finale pour le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir (Future Policy Award) sur la protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Anuncio de los principales candidatos al Future Policy Award 2021

4. Juni 2021 - 10:59
Anuncio de los principales candidatos al Future Policy Award 2021 sobre la protección contra las sustancias químicas peligrosas

Las políticas de Colombia, Cuba, Dinamarca, Etiopía, India, Corea, Kirguistán, Países Bajos, Filipinas, Sri Lanka, Suecia y Estados Unidos son principales candidatas al Future Policy Award, el Oscar de las mejores políticas

Ginebra, Hamburgo, Nairobi, París, 27 de mayo de 2021 – Hoy se ha anunciado la lista de finalistas del Future Policy Award 2021. El premio celebra las soluciones políticas más eficaces que minimizan los efectos adversos de la exposición a sustancias químicas en la salud humana y el medio ambiente. 12 políticas de 5 continentes son las principales candidatas al premio.

En total, se propusieron 55 políticas de 36 países. Un jurado internacional de expertos se reunió para deliberar sobre los mejores candidatos. El premio anual, comúnmente conocido como el Oscar de las mejores políticas, es el primer y único premio que celebra las políticas en beneficio de las generaciones presentes y futuras a nivel internacional. Las siguientes políticas han sido preseleccionadas este año (por categoría):

Los principales candidatos Future Policy Award 2021

Productos químicos a lo largo del ciclo de vida

  • India, Rajasthan: Política de detección, prevención, control y rehabilitación de la neumoconiosis, incluida la silicosis (2019)
  • Kirguistán: Resolución nº 43 sobre la aprobación del sistema de clasificación y comunicación de los peligros químicos y los requisitos de información sobre los peligros – etiquetado y ficha de datos de seguridad (2015)
  • República de Corea: Ley de seguridad de productos químicos de consumo y biocidas (2018)
  • Suecia, Consejo del Condado de Estocolmo: Lista de eliminación de sustancias químicas peligrosas para el medio ambiente y la salud humana (2012-2016, revisada para 2017-2021)
  • Estados Unidos, Massachusetts: Ley de reducción del uso de sustancias tóxicas (TURA, 1989, modificada en 2006)

Pesticidas altamente peligrosos

  • Cuba: Programa de Manejo Agroecológico de Plagas (MAP, 1993) y Plan Nacional de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutricional (Plan SAN, 2020)
  • Dinamarca: Planes de Acción sobre Pesticidas (PAP, 2013-2021) y Planes de Acción Ecológica para promover la producción ecológica en Dinamarca (PAO, 2011-2020)
  • Sri Lanka: Ley de Control de Pesticidas nº 33 (1980, modificada en 1994, 2011, 2020) y Política Nacional y Plan de Acción para la Prevención del Suicidio (1997)

Plomo en la pintura

  • Etiopía: Reglamento de control del plomo en la pintura nº 429 (2018)
  • Filipinas: Orden de control químico del plomo y los compuestos de plomo (CCO, 2013-24)

Contaminantes farmacéuticos persistentes en el medio ambiente

  • Colombia: Resolución 371 Por la cual se establecen los elementos a considerar en los Planes de Gestión de Devolución de Productos Farmacéuticos y Medicamentos Vencidos (2009)
  • Países Bajos: Programa de Implementación de la Cadena de Residuos Farmacéuticos en el Agua (2018-2022).

A principios de julio de 2021 se anunciarán los ganadores. El 6 de julio de 2021, celebraremos las políticas ganadoras del Future Policy Award 2021 con una ceremonia de entrega de premios virtual de alto nivel.

El premio lo concede el World Future Council y se organiza este año en colaboración con el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA), el Enfoque Estratégico para la Gestión Internacional de los Productos Químicos (SAICM), la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico (OCDE), el Instituto de las Naciones Unidas para la Formación y la Investigación (UNITAR) y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD).

La Organización Mundial de la Salud estimó en 1,6 millones de vidas la carga de enfermedad por exposición a determinadas sustancias químicas en 2016. [1]  Cada vez es mayor la preocupación por los efectos a largo plazo de la exposición a productos químicos y residuos nocivos para la salud, que incluyen diversas formas de cáncer, trastornos reproductivos, problemas de aprendizaje y otros efectos adversos para la salud. [2]  Se calculan los costes de los déficits neuroconductuales causados por la exposición a determinadas sustancias químicas a más de 170.000 millones de dólares al año solo en la Unión Europea. [3]

Se estima que hay más de 140.000 productos químicos fabricados en el mundo. [4]  Aunque muchas de estas sustancias químicas se comercializan, muchas de ellas nunca han sido sometidas a pruebas de seguridad adecuadas. Especialmente problemáticas son las sustancias químicas que acaban en nuestro ambiente -en las masas de agua, el suelo o el aire, en la cadena alimentaria o en el agua potable- o que se acumulan en nuestro cuerpo o en otros organismos. Las sustancias químicas peligrosas, como los bifenilos policlorados (PCB), los ftalatos, los metales pesados como el plomo, los pesticidas y los contaminantes farmacéuticos ambientalmente persistentes, pueden causar daños irreversibles en la salud de los seres humanos, la fauna, la flora y los ecosistemas.

“La gestión inadecuada de los productos químicos y los residuos tiene un enorme precio económico. Es necesario adoptar medidas reglamentarias urgentes para ahorrar el dinero de los contribuyentes y salvaguardar la salud y los recursos medioambientales críticos, especialmente cuando se prevé que la industria química crezca”, afirma Masamichi Kono, Secretario General Adjunto de la OCDE. “Necesitamos políticas ambiciosas y de impacto, como las preseleccionadas para el Future Policy Award 2021, con el fin de detener el impacto adverso sobre la salud y el medio ambiente y avanzar hacia una química sostenible.”

“Los productos químicos peligrosos son un reto complejo”, señala Nikhil Seth, subsecretario general de la ONU, y director ejecutivo del Instituto de las Naciones Unidas para la Formación y la Investigación (UNITAR). “Su gestión es una cuestión transversal de la Agenda 2030. La seguridad química y la gestión de los productos químicos tóxicos afectan a muchos, sino a todos, los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible. Aplaudo sinceramente a las políticas preseleccionadas del Future Policy Award 2021 por convertir esta cuestión crítica en acciones concretas.”

También es importante tener en cuenta la exposición a sustancias químicas peligrosas en el contexto laboral. Los trabajadores suelen estar expuestos a dosis más elevadas de sustancias químicas y durante períodos más largos, lo que aumenta los riesgos de sufrir efectos importantes sobre la salud. Se necesitan buenas políticas en el mundo del trabajo, y el Future Policy Award 2021 destaca ejemplos de cómo podemos seguir promoviendo la seguridad y la salud en el trabajo y la gestión racional de los productos químicos y residuos en todo el mundo.

Guy Ryder, Director General de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo (OIT), señala que “es nuestro deber reafirmar el derecho a un lugar de trabajo seguro y saludable para todos los trabajadores”.

“Todos los días se violan nuestros derechos por la exposición a productos químicos tóxicos y a la contaminación. Especialmente los niños se ven afectados de forma desproporcionada”, señala Alexandra Wandel, Directora Ejecutiva del World Future Council. “Por el bien de las generaciones actuales y futuras, es absolutamente crítico que las partes interesadas hagan de la protección contra los productos químicos peligrosos una prioridad. Estamos deseando llevar a la escena mundial políticas eficaces en este campo”.

 

ESTE PROYECTO CUENTA CON EL APOYO FINANCIERO DE:  

 

El editor es responsable del contenido de esta publicación.

Con el apoyo de la Fundación Michael Otto y la Fundación Jua.

 

Contacto para prensa y medios

Anna-Lara Stehn

Directora de Medios y Comunicación

World Future Council

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org

Nota a los editores

Acerca del Future Policy Award

Cada año, las políticas más impactantes que abordan los retos más urgentes de la humanidad se celebran a través del Future Policy Award, el primer y único premio que reconoce las políticas en beneficio de las generaciones presentes y futuras a nivel internacional. El objetivo del premio es sensibilizar a la opinión pública mundial sobre las políticas ejemplares y acelerar la acción política. El World Future Council concede este premio anual desde 2010 en colaboración con las agencias de la ONU y la UIP.

Información sobre los principales candidatos al Future Policy Award 2021

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/future-policy-award-2021-about-the-shortlisted-policies 

 

Acerca del World Future Council

El World Future Council (WFC) trabaja para legar a nuestros hijos y nietos un planeta sano y sostenible con sociedades justas y pacíficas. Para lograrlo, nos centramos en identificar, desarrollar, destacar y difundir soluciones eficaces y justas para el futuro para los retos actuales a los que se enfrenta la humanidad, y promovemos su aplicación en todo el mundo. El Consejo se compone de 50 eminentes agentes del cambio a nivel mundial procedentes de gobiernos, parlamentos, sociedades civiles, universidades, artes y el mundo empresarial. Jakob von Uexkull, el fundador del Premio Nobel Alternativo, lanzó el World Future Council en 2007. Somos una organización independiente y sin ánimo de lucro según la legislación alemana y financiamos nuestras actividades con asociaciones institucionales y donaciones.

Socios

 

Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) y el Enfoque Estratégico para la Gestión Internacional de los Productos Químicos (SAICM)

https://www.unep.org/

http://www.saicm.org/

Organización Internacional del Trabajo

https://www.ilo.org/

OCDE

https://www.oecd.org

PNUD

https://www.undp.org/

UNITAR

https://unitar.org/

[1] WHO (2016). Public health impact of chemicals: knowns and unknowns. https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-FWC-PHE-EPE-16.01-eng.

[2] WHO. Providing information on the health effect of chemicals. https://www.who.int/activities/providing-information-on-the-health-effects-of-chemicals.

[3] UNEP (2019). Global Chemicals Outlook II Summary for Policymakers: From Legacies to Innovative Solutions-Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. https://www.unep.org/resources/report/global-chemicals-outlook-ii-legacies-innovative-solutions.

[4] Landrigan, P.J. & Fuller, R. (2018). The Impact of Pollution on Planetary Health: Emergence of an Underappreciated Risk Factor. UNEP: Perspectives; Issue No. 29. https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/22416/Perspective_No_29_web.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

The post Anuncio de los principales candidatos al Future Policy Award 2021 appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Future Policy Award 2021: Shortlisted candidates announced

27. Mai 2021 - 9:46
Top Candidates for the Future Policy Award 2021 on Protection from Hazardous Chemicals announced

Policies from Colombia, Cuba, Denmark, Ethiopia, India, Korea, Kyrgyzstan, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Sweden, and the USA are shortlisted for the Oscar on Best Policies

Geneva, Hamburg, Nairobi, Paris, 27th May 2021 – The shortlist of the Future Policy Award 2021 was announced today. The award celebrates the most effective policy solutions that minimise the adverse effects of exposure to chemicals on human health and the environment. 12 Policies from 5 continents are the top candidates for the award.

In total, 55 policies from 36 countries were nominated. An international expert jury convened to deliberate on the top candidates. The annual award, often referred to as the Oscar on Best Policies, is the first and only award that celebrates policies for the benefit of present and future generations on an international level. The following policies have been shortlisted this year (per category):

Chemicals Across the Lifecycle

  • India, Rajasthan: Policy on Pneumoconiosis including Silicosis Detection, Prevention, Control and Rehabilitation (2019)
  • Kyrgyzstan: Resolution No. 43 on Approval of the Chemical Hazard Classification System and Hazard Information Requirements – Labelling and Safety Data Sheet (2015)
  • Republic of Korea: Consumer Chemical Products and Biocides Safety Act (2018)
  • Sweden, Stockholm County Council: Phase-Out List for Chemicals Hazardous to the Environment and Human Health (2012-2016, revised for 2017-2021)
  • USA, Massachusetts: Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA, 1989, amended 2006)

Highly Hazardous Pesticides

  • Cuba: Programme for Agroecological Pest Management (MAP, 1993) and National Plan for Food and Nutrition Security (Plan SAN, 2020)
  • Denmark: Action Plans on Pesticides (PAP, 2013-2021) and Organic Action Plans to Promote Organic Production in Denmark (OAP, 2011-2020)
  • Sri Lanka: Control of Pesticides Act No. 33 (1980, amended in 1994, 2011, 2020) and

National Policy and Action Plan on Prevention of Suicide (1997)

Lead in Paint

  • Ethiopia: Lead in Paint Control Regulation No. 429 (2018)
  • Philippines: Chemical Control Order for Lead and Lead Compounds (CCO, 2013-24)

Environmentally Persistent Pharmaceutical Pollutants

  • Colombia: Resolution 371 Establishing the Elements to be considered in the Management Plans for the Return of Pharmaceutical Products and Expired Medicines (2009)
  • The Netherlands: Chain Approach to Pharmaceutical Residues in Water Implementation Programme (2018-2022).

In early July 2021, the winners will be announced. On 6th July 2021, we will celebrate the winning policies of the Future Policy Award 2021 with a high-level, virtual Award Ceremony.

The prize is awarded by the World Future Council and is organised this year in partnership with the United Nation Environment Programme (UNEP), the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)future-policy-award-2021-about-the-shortlisted-policies, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

The World Health Organization estimated the burden of disease from exposure to selected chemicals at 1.6 million lives in 2016.[1] There is growing concern about the long-term health effects of exposure to harmful chemicals and waste, which include various forms of cancer, reproductive disorders, learning disabilities, and other adverse health impacts.[2] Costs from neurobehavioural deficits caused by exposure to certain chemicals is estimated to be more than USD 170 billion per year in the European Union alone.[3]

Estimates are that there are over 140,000 human-made chemicals in the world.[4] Though many of these chemicals are in commerce, many of them have never been properly tested for safety. Particularly problematic are chemicals that end up in our environment – in water bodies, soil or air, in the food chain or in drinking water – or that accumulate in our bodies or other organisms. Hazardous chemicals, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalates, heavy metals such as lead, pesticides, and environmentally persistent pharmaceutical pollutants, can cause irreversible harm to the health of humans, fauna, flora, and ecosystems.

“The unsound management of chemicals and waste comes with an enormous economic price tag. Urgent regulatory action is needed to save taxpayers’ money and safeguard health and critical environmental resources, especially as the chemical industry is expected to grow”, says Masamichi Kono, Deputy Secretary General of the OECD. “We need ambitious and impactful policies, such as the ones shortlisted for the Future Policy Award 2021, to stop the adverse impact on health and the environment and to move towards sustainable chemistry.”

“Hazardous chemicals are a complex challenge”, Nikhil Seth, UN Assistant Secretary General, and Executive Director of the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) points out. “Their management is a cross-cutting issue of the Agenda 2030. Chemical safety and the management of toxic chemicals touches many, if not all, of the Sustainable Development Goals. I truly applaud the shortlisted policies of the Future Policy Award 2021 for translating this critical issue into concrete action.“

It is also important to consider hazardous chemical exposures in the working environment. Workers tend to be exposed to higher doses of chemicals, and over longer periods, increasing their risk of significant health effects. Good policies in the world of work are needed, and the 2021 Future Policy Award highlights examples of how we can continue to promote occupational safety and health and the sound management of chemicals and waste worldwide.

Guy Ryder, Director-General of the International Labour Organization (ILO) notes that “It is our duty to reaffirm the right to a safe and healthy working environment for all working people.”

“Every day our rights are violated by the exposure to toxic chemicals and pollution. Especially children are disproportionally affected”, remarks Alexandra Wandel, Executive Director of the World Future Council. “For the sake of current and future generations, it is absolutely critical that stakeholders make the protection from hazardous chemicals a priority. We are very much looking forward to bring effective policies in this field to a world stage.”

 

This project is financially supported by:      

The publisher is responsible for the content of this publication.

With the support of the Michael Otto Foundation and the Jua Foundation.

 

Media Contact

Anna-Lara Stehn

Media and Communications Manager

World Future Council

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org

Note to Editors

About the Future Policy Award

Every year, the most impactful policies tackling humankind’s most pressing challenges are celebrated through the Future Policy Award, the first and only award that recognizes policies for the benefit of present and future generations on an international level. The aim of the Award is to raise global awareness for exemplary policies and speed up policy action. The World Future Council has awarded this annual prize since 2010 in partnership with UN agencies and the IPU.

About the shortlisted policies for the Future Policy Award 2021

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/future-policy-award-2021-about-the-shortlisted-policies 

 

About the World Future Council

The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying, developing, highlighting, and spreading effective, future-just solutions for current challenges humanity is facing, and promote their implementation worldwide. The Council consists of 50 eminent global change-makers from governments, parliaments, civil societies, academia, the arts, and the business world. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organisation under German law and finance our activities with institutional partnerships and donations.

Partners

About the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) & the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM)

https://www.unep.org/

http://www.saicm.org/

About the International Labour Organisation

https://www.ilo.org/

About the OECD

https://www.oecd.org

About UNDP

https://www.undp.org/

About UNITAR

https://unitar.org/

Footnotes

[1] WHO (2016). Public health impact of chemicals: knowns and unknowns. https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-FWC-PHE-EPE-16.01-eng.

[2] WHO. Providing information on the health effect of chemicals. https://www.who.int/activities/providing-information-on-the-health-effects-of-chemicals.

[3] UNEP (2019). Global Chemicals Outlook II Summary for Policymakers: From Legacies to Innovative Solutions-Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. https://www.unep.org/resources/report/global-chemicals-outlook-ii-legacies-innovative-solutions.

[4] Landrigan, P.J. & Fuller, R. (2018). The Impact of Pollution on Planetary Health: Emergence of an Underappreciated Risk Factor. UNEP: Perspectives; Issue No. 29. https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/22416/Perspective_No_29_web.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y.

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Future Policy Award 2021: about the shortlisted policies

27. Mai 2021 - 9:45
Overview texts Future Policy Award 2021

Please find below in-depth information about the policies shortlisted for the Future Policy Award 2021, Protection on Hazardous Chemicals.

Chemicals Across the Lifecycle India, Rajasthan: Policy on Pneumoconiosis including Silicosis Detection, Prevention, Control and Rehabilitation (2019)

The Rajasthan Policy is unique in helping victims of dust-related occupational lung diseases, known as pneumoconiosis, by tapping into existing relief schemes, developing, and implementing prevention measures in the mining sector, as well as developing a better overall health system. The Policy already helps around 25,000 people suffering from silicosis, a specific type of pneumoconiosis caused by exposure to silica dust. It encompasses a comprehensive programme for detection, health surveillance and rehabilitation, as well as training for medical doctors and awareness raising among workers and communities. Today, 5,000 to 6,000 new cases are certified each year and more than 85,000 persons have registered for screening and certification. The policy has a good potential for replication especially in low and middle-income countries, which often have insufficient preventative systems in place for the detection, prevention, control, and rehabilitation of occupational diseases.

Kyrgyzstan: Resolution No. 43 on Approval of the Chemical Hazard Classification System and Hazard Information Requirements – Labelling and Safety Data Sheet (2015)

Kyrgyzstan is one of the few countries in the world to make the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) legally binding. The GHS is an internationally agreed-upon system managed by the UN for classification of chemicals by types of hazard. The provisions are reflected in the work and budgets of all relevant government agencies and ministries. Employees of 219 public institutions, businesses, and NGOs have been instructed about the use of GHS in their sectors. Companies trained more than 6,500 employees to ensure safety at the workplace. All 14 pesticide suppliers and 42 fertilizer suppliers apply GHS hazard classification and labelling. Moreover, consumers are increasingly paying attention to product labelling. Kyrgyzstan’s visionary Resolution can inspire many other countries to implement the GHS.

Republic of Korea: Consumer Chemical Products and Biocides Safety Act (2018)

Government, industry, and civil society came together to react jointly to a growing societal concern regarding health impacts of chemicals. The Act works through safety and labelling standards for consumer chemical products, pre-market approvals for products requiring verification, and voluntary agreements between industry, civil society groups, and government. Products for cleaning and laundry, disinfectants, air fresheners and odour-eliminating products, dyes and paints, beauty products, and preservatives are examples for product groups which are now subject to safety verification. From 2016 to 2020, the total number of notified ‘safety verification-required products’ increased from 8,000 to approximately 70,000. Furthermore, 19 companies disclosed all ingredients of 1,125 consumer products. Industry voluntarily disclosing all information on chemical substances in products is an important transparency outcome of the Act.

Sweden, Region Stockholm: Phase-Out List for Chemicals Hazardous to the Environment and Human Health (2012-2016, revised for 2017-2021)

Region Stockholm has agreed a phase-out list for chemicals hazardous to the environment and the health of citizens, employees, and patients. The list comprises chemicals and chemical products e.g., in healthcare, laboratories, dentistry, IT, cleaning, textiles, and allergy inducing fragrances or preservatives. Furthermore, Region Stockholm prevent purchasing and procurement of chemicals and chemical products as well as articles and consumables containing toxic substances that fall within a large number of specified categories, such as: may cause cancer; and may cause inheritable genetic damage. The list is mandatory for all chemical products procured by Region Stockholm. Since 2012 a significant proportion of hazardous chemicals have been phased out, especially from the healthcare sector. The healthcare sector saw a 90 percent reduction in the use of listed substances, decreasing volumes in weight from 1,100 kg to 115 kg. The phase-out list serves as an inspiration for regions and countries around the world.

USA, Massachusetts: Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA) (1989, amended 2006)

Globally, TURA was the pioneering policy addressing hazardous chemicals. TURA implements reduction strategies for toxic and hazardous substances, including changes in production processes, use of raw materials or in the generation of hazardous by-products. Between 2007 and 2017, TURA worked with 420 companies, eliminating 860 million kilogrammes of hazardous chemicals. The companies reduced toxic chemical use by 26 percent and toxic by-product waste by 19 percent. Moreover, Massachusetts has invested in its human resources. Today more than 1,200 Toxic Use Reduction Planners help businesses to complete their planning processes, certify their plans and advance the assessment of alternatives. There is great potential for other countries to replicate and the EU REACH regulation includes several elements of TURA.

Highly Hazardous Pesticides Cuba: Programme for Agroecological Pest Management (MAP, 1993) and National Plan for Food and Nutrition Security (Plan SAN, 2020)

Cuba has one of the most advanced organic agricultural production systems in the world, with strong supportive policies in place. Around 30 percent of the country’s agricultural area is managed without the use of agrochemicals. This is reflected in Cuba’s pesticide consumption, which decreased by 77 percent between 1990 and 2005, also due to political circumstances. Similarly, annual imports of pesticides show a constant reduction, from 23,900 tonnes (1986-1990) to 9,900 tonnes (2010-2018). In Cuba, 31 highly hazardous pesticides have been forbidden, whilst others are authorized for state-owned farms but not for public sale. Cuba’s agroecological transition is one of the most promising approaches to sustainably feeding people in a nutritious, equitable, environmentally sound, and resilient way.

Denmark: Action Plans on Pesticides (PAP, 2013-2021) and Organic Action Plans to Promote Organic Production in Denmark (OAP, 2011-2020)

The conversion of a flat tax on land into a green tax on pesticide consumption, in combination with a restrictive authorization procedure for approval of pesticides, proved to be the winning move in Denmark. Today, the Danish PAPs and OAPs impact 100 percent of the country’s agricultural area, achieving that 13 percent of agricultural area is farmed without pesticides (12 percent organic farmland plus 1 percent non-spray area). The pesticide load on the remaining 87 percent of agricultural area has been reduced by 40 percent and to a large extent, highly hazardous pesticides have been phased out. Revenue from the pesticide tax funds fully the Danish PAPs and it helps financing several organic initiatives. As a result, Denmark has today the highest market share of organic products in the world.

Sri Lanka: Control of Pesticides Act No. 33 (1980, amended in 1994, 2011, 2020) and National Policy and Action Plan on Prevention of Suicide (1997)

Sri Lanka had one of the world’s highest suicide rates, and pesticide poisoning accounted for more than two thirds of all cases. The Pesticides Act ensures that only least hazardous pesticides are available. It has been used to ban a total of 36 HHPs. Sri Lanka’s pesticide regulations have contributed to one of the greatest decreases in suicide rates ever achieved in the world. The country’s suicide rate has been reduced by 70 percent, particularly in rural villages and among children and youth. The bans saved about 93,000 lives over 20 years at a direct government cost of less than USD 50 per life. Whilst at the same time, Sri Lanka has maintained its agricultural productivity. Internationally, the Sri Lankan experience recommends the banning of HHPs as one of the most cost-effective approaches for suicide prevention.

Lead in Paint Ethiopia: Lead in Paint Control Regulation No. 429 (2018)

Lead is one of the top ten chemicals of major health concern according to the World Health Organisation. Ethiopia’s Lead in Paint Control Regulation bans manufacture, import, export, wholesale, distribution, and sale of any paint with a total lead concentration above 90 ppm. It enforces responsible labelling, ensures the disposal of paints which use lead in an environmentally-sound manner, obliges building owners to examine the concentration of lead in paint before demolishing a building and places the responsibility to reduce exposure and prevent harm, particularly against children, on the producers. In 2019, only one year after the enactment of the Regulation, experts estimated that 86 percent of paint producers have decreased their lead concentration to 90 ppm or below, adopted the labelling system, and responsibly complied with the provisions provided by the Regulation.

Philippines: Chemical Control Order for Lead and Lead Compounds (CCO, 2013-24)

With the CCO, the Philippines became the first Southeast Asian country to successfully implement legislation towards lead-safe paint. The policy’s objective is to increase awareness of the toxicity of lead exposure and to provide safer alternatives to protect the health of the population and the environment. It comprises a roadmap with clear definitions, phase-out plans, and decisive instruments with special attention to children. The CCO combines a collaborative top-down and bottom-up strategy with successful implementation. While globally only a few countries have enacted comprehensive bans on the use of lead additives in all paints, the Philippines demonstrate that it is entirely possible to restrict the use of lead in all paints to the maximum limit of 90 ppm, including in industrial paints, which generally have lead concentrations that are up to 10 times higher. By 2020, the local industry had beaten the phase-out deadline for lead paints with a total of 1,395 paint products certified through the new Lead Safe Paint® Certification programme.

 

Environmentally Persistent Pharmaceutical Pollutants Colombia: Resolution 371 Establishing the elements to be considered in the Management Plans for the Return of Pharmaceutical Products and Expired Medicines (2009)

Around 4,000 active pharmaceutical ingredients are being administered worldwide in prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs, and veterinary drugs. While pharmaceuticals are stringently regulated for efficacy and patient safety, the adverse side effects they may have in the natural environment are a growing topic of concern. In 2009, Colombia introduced Resolution 371 as part of the national policy for regulating waste management from hazardous products. The Resolution’s remarkable feature is that it places the responsibilities and costs of implementation on the manufacturers and importers of pharmaceuticals and medications, in line with the ‘polluter pays’ principle. By 2018, a total of 711 manufacturers and importers participated in the policy, corresponding to 95 percent of the market share. Moreover, a total of 2,593 take-back points had been established to collect medicines, covering 70 percent of the population, and more than 930 tons of medicines had already been properly disposed of. As such, the Resolution represents the first successful compulsory medicine disposal programme in Latin America, which inspires neighbouring countries to develop similar approaches.

 

The Netherlands: Chain Approach to Pharmaceutical Residues in Water Implementation Programme (2018-2022)

In response to the emerging issue of environmentally persistent pharmaceutical pollutants, the Netherland’s Chain Approach Programme addresses both aquatic ecology and the safety of drinking water. This includes prevention and education in the use, production, distribution, disposal, and wastewater treatment of pharmaceutical residues. Since 2018, implemented measures include the start of 15 pilot projects that upgrade wastewater treatment plants, which together serve around 1 million inhabitant equivalents. The programme’s goal that all Dutch pharmacies should collect medicines and that the municipalities bear the costs has been achieved by 95 percent. The Chain Approach Programme has informed the development of the EU’s Strategic Approach to Pharmaceuticals in the Environment, which identifies strategies for different actions along the lifecycle of pharmaceuticals.

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Newsletter April 2021

6. Mai 2021 - 17:59

The post Newsletter April 2021 appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg