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World Future Council offers support to UN Summit of the Future 2023

29. September 2021 - 14:47
World Future Council offers support to UN Summit of the Future 2023

“The United Nations needs to reinvent itself to remain relevant in the future”, says youngest Council Member

28 September 2021, New York/Hamburg. – Recently, the UN Secretary General published the UN Common Agenda proposal for the Summit of the Future 2023. As governments conclude plenary debates on the Agenda during the UN General Assembly, the World Future Council (WFC) is offering their support. The organisation, consisting of over 50 international change-makers, has a proven in-depth knowledge of future-just policy-making. In making their offer, the World Future Council underlines the need for governments to better address the rights and needs of future generations.

„For many years, we have urged governments and the UN to establish a High Commissioner for Future Generations. We therefore applaud and welcome the proposal for Special Envoy for Future Generations, a Futures Lab and a Declaration on Future Generations ”says Maria Fernanda Espinosa, Councillor of the WFC and former President of the UN General Assembly. “Young change-makers should speak for themselves, and have a seat at the table. The special envoy can pave the way.”

„We offer our knowledge and that of our members to prepare the Summit of the Future. With our Future Policy Award we showcase how future-just policies look in practice. We provide a rich pool of innovative policy solutions on key challenges the humanity is facing. This is something the UN could benefit from when preparing the Summit“, says Alexandra Wandel, Director of the World Future Council.

The WFC has advocated to address the rights and needs of future generations since 2007. For years, the organisation has been cooperating with UN organisations with the Future Policy Award, also known as “Policy Oscar”, showing how global UN issues can be broken down through impactful and future-just policies.

“The United Nations needs to reinvent itself to remain relevant in the future, in a post pandemic world.”, says the youngest Councillor of the World Future Council Kehkashan Basu. “Fulfilling the objectives of the 12-point plan outlined by the UN in its ‘Our Common Agenda’ report and its proposal for a Summit for the Future will be essential towards accelerating the implementation of the SDGs and ensuring that the talks and discussions finally turn into actions on the ground to truly leave no one behind.”

Media Contact

Miriam Petersen

Senior Communications Consultant

Miriam.petersen@ext.worldfuturecouncil.org

About the World Future Council

The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying, developing, highlighting, and spreading effective, future-just solutions for current challenges humanity is facing, and promote their implementation worldwide. The Council consists of 50 eminent global change-makers from governments, parliaments, civil societies, academia, the arts, and the business world. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organisation under German law and finance our activities with institutional partnerships and donations.

www.worldfuturecouncil.org

About the Future Policy Award

Every year, the most impactful policies tackling humankind’s most pressing challenges are celebrated through the Future Policy Award, the first and only award that recognizes policies for the benefit of present and future generations on an international level. The aim of the Award is to raise global awareness for exemplary policies and speed up policy action. The World Future Council has awarded this annual prize since 2010 in partnership with UN agencies and the IPU.

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/future-policy-award/

The post World Future Council offers support to UN Summit of the Future 2023 appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Industrial States to be held individually responsible for global warming ?

28. September 2021 - 11:58

The six Portuguese youths base their lawsuit before the ECtHR on the devastating forest fires in Portugal.

Industrial States to be held individually responsible for global warming ? – Part I 

States’ obligations and differences in 1.5 °C and 2 °C global warming 

During the World Leaders Summit on Climate on 22 and 23 April 2021 US- President Biden announced the ambitious 2030 emissions target as the new contribution of the USA under the Paris Agreement and urged the other 40 world leaders to contribute also to stronger climate ambition. In recent years the consciousness for changing climate and its significant impacts has been growing in politics and societies. It became clear that the world’s most vulnerable populations will face the worst impacts of climate change though some of those countries had contributed the least to the greenhouse gas emissions.  

European States are held responsible for the impacts of changing climate: De Hoge Raad der Nederlanden, (Supreme Court of the Netherlands) ordered in its judgement from  

20 December 2019 the State of the Netherlands to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by the end of 2020 by at least 25% compared to 1990. Alike, das Bundesverfassungsgericht, (The German Federal Constitutional Court), released on 29 April 2021 its decision from  

24 March 2021 ordering that the German legislator does not meet its constitutional obligations to adopt the suitable legislation for CO2 emissions mitigation until 2030 in order to reach the target of climate neutrality in 2050 without being coerced to interfere inappropriately in fundamental freedoms from 2030 onwards. The complainants are insofar violated in their fundamental rights.  

And beyond, on 7 September 2020 six Portuguese youths filed a complaint to the European Court of Human Rights against Portugal and 32 other European States asserting that those 33 States violate human rights set forth in the Convention by neglecting their obligations enshrined in the United Nations Framework Convention and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.  

Complex juridical questions are arisen by those complaints: inter alia whether the complainant’s damage caused by global warming might be attributable to the omission of one industrial State to enact suitable measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and which due diligence standard has to be met by the State to fulfil its treaty obligations.  

However, before answering these questions by a legal assessment notably of international environmental law, the following seeks to well- establish first the context of those cases.  

According to the 2020 report on Fossil CO2 emissions of all world countries provided by the European Commission global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels combustion and processes further increased by + 0.9% in 2019, about half of the previous annual growth rate (+1.9% in 2018). In 2019 the world’s largest CO2 emitters – China with 29.7% global share in 2018, the United States with 13.9%, the EU27 +UK with 9.2%, India with 6.9%, Russia with 4.6% and Japan with 3.2% – emitted about 67 % of total global fossil CO2. Emissions from these five countries and the EU27+UK show different changes in 2019 compared to 2018:  

The largest relative increase is found for China with +3.4% (2017-2018: +1.5%), followed by India with +1.6% (2017-2018: +7.2%). On the contrary, the EU27+UK with -3.8% (2017-2018: -1.9%), the United States with -2.6% (2017-2018: +2.9%), Japan with -2.1% (2017-2018: -1.7%), and Russia with -0.8% (2017-2018: +3.6%) reduced their fossil CO2 emissions.  

China, the biggest CO2 – remittent, repeated its pre-existing ambitions to reach the peak of its CO2 emissions until 2030 and climate neutrality until 2050 emphasizing the diverging responsibilities of industrial- and development states for global warming on the World Leader Summit on Climate (see also Art. 4 §1 and Art. 7 §7d) of the Paris Agreement). While the former US-President Obama pursued the target of CO2 emissions reduction by -26% until 2030, President Biden just announced the relatively ambitious target to reduce CO2-emissions until 2030 by 50% to 52% and -alike China- to reach climate neutrality until 2050.  

The Paris-Agreement, adopted by 196 Parties on 12 December 2015, pursues the goal to limit global warming to well below 2 °C, preferably to 1.5 °C, compared to pre-industrial levels (see Art. 2 § 1 lit.a) of the Agreement). Countries aim to reach peaking of greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible and to achieve a climate neutral world by mid-century (see Art. 4 § 1 of the Agreement). 

The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a group of scientists from 130 countries created by the UN Environmental Program in 1998, stated in its special report that the global average temperature reached 0.87 °C in the decade 2006-2015 relative to the pre-industrial level. Given that global temperature is currently rising by 0.2 °C per decade, human-induced warming would reach 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels around 2040. The IPCC found that an overshoot of 1.5 °C and the reliance on future large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide removal (which would require a profound transformation in the agricultural use of lands) can only be avoided if global CO2 emissions start to decline well before 2030. However, the estimate outcome of current nationally stated mitigation ambitions as submitted under the Paris Agreement would not limit global warming to 1.5 °C, even if supplemented by very challenging increases in the scale and ambition of emissions reductions after 2030. 

The differences in impacts of temperature raise of 1.5 °C opposed to 2 °C are significant: limiting global mean temperature increase to 1.5 °C could substantially reduce the risk of reduced water availability in some regions. Regions that are projected to benefit the most robustly from restricted warming include the Mediterranean and southern Africa. At 2 °C of global warming, the risk of food shortage are projected to be much larger and to emerge in the African Sahel, the Mediterranean, central Europe, the Amazonia, and western and southern Africa. 

Moreover, under 1.2 °C of global warming, fire frequency has been estimated to increase by over 37.8% of global land areas, compared to 61.9% of global land areas under 3.5 °C of global warming.  

At 2 °C of warming more than 90% of global coastlines are projected to experience sea level rise greater than 0.2 m, suggesting differences in the risk of coastal flooding.  

Already apparent at 1.5 °C of warming, regionally differentiated multi-sector risks are more prevalent where vulnerable people live, predominantly in South Africa (Pakistan, India, China) but expected to spread to sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East, and East Asia as temperatures rises, with the world’s poorest people disproportionately impacted at 2 °C of warming. The hydrological impacts of climate change in Europe are projected to increase in spatial extent and intensity across increasing global warming levels of 1.5 °C to 2.0 °C based on the assessment of risks to food shortage, water resources, drought, heat exposure and coastal submergence.  

As regards to the far-reaching impacts of global warming Part II to this article will discuss climate change as a conflict threat multiplier and will carve out the urgent need for providence of adaptation strategies and risk management to support most vulnerable people exposed the most to the impacts going beyond pathways of greenhouse gas emission mitigation. 

Part III will finally address the judicial question of a partial state responsibility and in the affirmative case the consequences of such a state responsibility.  

Corinna WilkeningAuthor

Corinna Wilkening, lawyer (L.L.M. International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights) and lector for the scientific magazines “Europäische Grundrechte Zeitschrift” and the Human Rights Law Journal

World Future Council

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Kategorien: Hamburg

About virtual friendship, Nordic countries and sustainability

27. September 2021 - 15:51

Gesa is our working student in the Rights of Children and Youth Team. Before, she was volunteering for the World Future Council in the Admin team. 

Author: Gesa Dolkemeyer, About virtual friendship, Nordic countries and sustainability, and new adventures during the pandemic

About virtual friendship, Nordic countries and sustainability, and new adventures during the pandemic

When the pandemic started, I was in the middle of finishing up my bachelor studies in Malmö, Sweden. As I was writing my bachelor thesis about South-Korea’s development policies at that point, Covid-19 had little impact on my life in the beginning. I was stuck at home or in the library either way trying to wrap up the things I had learnt for the past two and a half years. Moreover, I was in a country that had a different approach to the whole situation as most other parts of the world. Whether it was a better or worse approach is more than questionable but for me it meant that I was able to finish my studies in Sweden in a good way. That also meant that I was lucky enough to have the opportunity of a real good-bye from my friends.

Still, as I left Sweden it was uncertain when I would be able to see my friends again, as most of them either stayed in Sweden or moved back to their respective countries. And it was not only the distance but now also the Covid restrictions that made a possibly reunion difficult.

Starting a new chapter of life, I moved to Hamburg to start working at the World Future Council. Out of my closest friend one stayed in Sweden, one moved back to Finland, and one moved back to Scotland. This meant we were not only in four different countries but also in three different time zones. Who would have thought that now I still feel closer to them than maybe I ever have before?

Covid has definitely played its role in this development. For one, all four of us had more time on our hands, due to the fact that activities were very limited for most of the year that has passed since we finished our bachelor. That meant more time and flexibility for video and zoom calls.

We started to hang out weekly on zoom, just talking and playing games. It felt surprisingly less different from when we used to be together several times a week back in Sweden. As I had moved to a new city, where I knew no one really, I was more than happy to at least have some virtual meet-ups and my close friend that I could share with what was happening in my life. So, while Covid made it hard to settle in Hamburg and make the new city a home for me, it was also easier to keep in touch with my friends abroad.

As the pandemic was winding down, it began to show that maybe keeping in touch would become more difficult with all of us starting routines in their own places again. So, one of us came up with a great idea to integrate our weekly meetings into our own routines and at the same time start a new fun activity together: A podcast! We usually liked discussing topics that were brought up throughout our studies and put everyday news into our own perspective. Especially topics around the Nordic countries and their external image were a reoccurring theme, as we had all lived in one of the countries together and found that the way they were portrayed was not necessarily the reality. So we were excited to use our enthusiasm for discussing in a new way. A podcast would on the one hand enable us to gain more experience in formulating and discussing our thoughts in a different format. On the other hand, we would be able to share our perspectives with other people who would hopefully find them interesting and stimulating. When one of us found out about a funding opportunity with the Nordic Youth in Sustainable Communities, we put our ideas into action and applied for the funding.

Now it was determined that we were starting this new project together, which would be both a great experience for us as a group and also a great asset to our CVs! We got granted a small amount of funding, therefore there was nothing stopping us from setting up a Drive folder and diving right into it. The thematic focus was to be “sustainability and the Nordic Countries”, as that was an issue we were interested in personally and at the same time fitting the support we got from the Nordic Youth in Sustainable Communities. With the podcast, our weekly Zoom meetings continued and besides working on the project we were able to still share the ups and downs of our daily lives.

The first episode of the podcast has been published this week and focuses on the earth overshoot day in the Nordic Countries. You can listen to our podcast on all relevant platforms, and you find us under The Social Balcony – Demystifying the Nordic Utopia.

All in all, for me personally, the pandemic has shown that it is possible to find new ways of communicating and interacting with friends far away. And despite it all, we were able to still create new adventures together even if we were a few thousand kilometers apart.

If you want to follow our journey going forward and are interested in sustainability and the Nordic Country, please feel free to listen to our podcast and follow us on all relevant social media channels under @socialbalcony!

Listen to our first episode on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/37mlr8yBDrXXWHolcnF6Ya

Our Website: The Social Balcony – Demystifying the Nordic Utopia

Our Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesocialbalcony/

The post About virtual friendship, Nordic countries and sustainability appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Pathfinder 2020

22. September 2021 - 14:21
About the Pathfinder 2020

No one will forget the year 2020. We all have a deeply personal connection with it: sorrow, separation, grief, and loss. But for many of us, 2020 was also a spark for change. The pandemic gave us an opportunity to break new ground and to build more resilient and healthy societies.

For us, the current crisis has also been an opportunity. At the World Future Council we are working towards a healthy, sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies. This heartfelt commitment connects us with our supporters. We are working together to ensure that rebuilding in the aftermath of the pandemic is done in the interest of present and future generations. To achieve this, we identify the best solutions to humanity’s challenges, make them visible, and promote their worldwide implementation.

On the following pages, we invite you to learn more about our projects and achievements, our solutions and activities, our methods of working, and our global network. Without your dedicated support, we could not be this successful. For this, we thank you sincerely!

As our founder Jakob von Uexküll says: “We all make a difference in this world. It is up to us to decide whether our contribution changes it for the better or not.”


Download

Content

Hazardous chemicals: Children and pregnant women are particularly at risk. How can people and the environment be protected?

Empower Children and Youth! They bear the brunt of the pandemic. Why their future is at risk, and how their participation and education can be strengthened.

100% renewable energy for all! How we have helped Bangladesh, Tanzania, Uganda, Vietnam, and other countries achieve this.

Sustainable ecosystems and habitats: Our commitment to agroecology and marine conservation.

Less nuclear weapons, more human rights! Bombs are useless for preventing pandemics, poverty, and other crises. Insights into our work towards peace and disarmament

“We need to develop a new relationship with animals and nature and a new
sustainable economy before it is too late” – Read our Interview with Jane Goodall

The post Pathfinder 2020 appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Regulating the Hype: Renewable Hydrogen in the Global South

21. September 2021 - 14:10
Regulating the Hype: Renewable Hydrogen in the Global South About

In order to limit global warming to 1.5°C as required under the Paris Agreement, all sectors of the economy need to decarbonise. This requires countries to become much more energy-efficient and to minimise fossil fuel-intensive practices (e.g. meat consumption, short-distance flights) and affluent countries to also drastically reduce energy consumption. Most sectors such as private and public transport, industrial heating processes, residential heating, etc. can be decarbonised through direct electrification powered by renewable energy (RE). Some sectors (e.g. steel, aluminum, cement, chemical industries, aviation, shipping), however, cannot be easily electrified. For those (end-use) sectors, renewable hydrogen (green) can be a solution for decarbonisation. 

To date, however, no significant renewables-based hydrogen production is in place. Current hydrogen strategies are nevertheless slowly taking up renewable hydrogen as a long-term investment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and massive upscaling of projects can be expected, as part of countries’ post-COVID-19 recovery measures. 

To ensure hydrogen production does not further accelerate the climate crisis and countries won’t be locked in a fossil fuel pathway for decades, hydrogen strategies need to focus on renewable hydrogen production. By increasing renewable energy capacities, countries could leapfrog into the renewable energy age, enhance climate action, strengthen local value creation and increase job opportunities for local communities. In addition, local production and use of renewable hydrogen could fast-track access to energy services, further contributing to economic development, as compared to exporting renewable hydrogen which would reduce locally available energy resources. 

This publication analyses strengths, weaknesses as well as opportunities and threats related to renewable hydrogen production in the Global South, highlights social and environmental criteria for sustainability and concludes with policy recommendations for renewable hydrogen production. 


Full Policy Brief

The post Regulating the Hype: Renewable Hydrogen in the Global South appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

Protected: 100% Renewable Energy Roadmap Development

14. September 2021 - 14:49

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Kategorien: Hamburg

The Good Council – The official podcast of the World Future Council

6. September 2021 - 11:21
The Good Council – The official podcast of the World Future Council, season 1 out now

First episode with founder of the World Future Council, Jakob von Uexkull, to be launched 6 September 2021.
Hamburg, 6th of September 2021 – The new podcast series of the World Future Council, The Good Council, launches today for the first season of intergenerational dialogues involving the World Future Council’s youth forum, Youth:Present. Each dialogue involves two changemakers—Councillors and Youth:Present representatives or young WFC members—who discuss their work towards a sustainable present and a common future.

Established in 2007, the World Future Council is a foundation that envisions a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies – now and in the future. To achieve this, the foundation identifies, develops, highlights, and disseminates future-just solutions for the current challenges of humanity. Every year, it celebrates outstanding policies in areas of urgent attention, such as biodiversity, rights of women and children, or protection from hazardous chemicals, with the Future Policy Award. This podcast series provides a behind-the-scenes insight into how a revolutionary idea became reality, from the very beginnings to its current agenda, offering inspiration, best practices, entertainment, and food for thought.

“For the first season of this new podcast series, we’re bringing together our co-founders and Councillors with young activists and entrepreneurs from around the globe in intergenerational dialogues”, says Alexandra Wandel, Chair of the Management Board, “We are very excited by this podcast which covers some inspiring stories, and personal insights between the trailblazers and changemakers who make up the World Future Council”.

The first episode of this brand-new season focuses on the establishment of the World Future Council, told by founder Jakob von Uexkull, as well as his concerns for the present and hopes for the future. How can the course of destruction be reversed? And is humanity still up for the challenge?

Part of the first season are Youth:Present representatives Raina Ivanova (Germany) and Patricia Kombo and Akinyi Obama-Manners (both from Kenya). They talk to German pioneer and thinker Prof. Ernst-Ulrich von Weizsäcker, Kenyan environmentalist Wanjira Mathai (known for furthering the Green Belt Movement founded by Wangari Mathai), and Nigerian human rights activist Hafsat Abiola-Costello, respectively. Together with Greta Thunberg of Sweden, Raina is currently part of the first legal challenge by 16 young activists to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child. Patricia is promoting education for sustainable development in Kenya, including by planting trees, for which she has also been named a UNCCD Land Hero by the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification. And Akinyi Obama-Manners is advancing children’s education at Kenyan foundation Sauti Kuu, founded by Auma Obama.

Also featured in this first season of The Good Council are co-founders Prof Herbert Girardet, expert on regenerative cities and Club of Rome member, and Dr Michael Otto, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of the Otto Group in Hamburg, Germany. Both discuss successes of the work of the World Future Council, as well as what each person can do in their lives individually.

“In order to build our common future, it is of utmost importance to consult all generations. In particular, young people of today will be leaders of tomorrow – without them, we will not be successful in preserving our planet for future generations. That’s why intergenerational dialogues, as in The Good Council, play a crucial role in that endeavour, and I very much enjoyed being part of it,” says Jakob von Uexkull, Founder of the World Future Council and the Alternative Nobel Price.

Each episode will inform and entertain by providing listeners with inspirational stories of people and best practices that will help people and the planet towards achieving sustainable solutions for our common future. New episodes will be released every other Monday, starting 6 September 2021.

All episodes will be available at https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/the-good-council/, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen.


MEDIA CONTACT
Anna-Lara Stehn
Media & Communications Manager
World Future Council
anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org
+49 (0) 1703813807

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Climate communications workshop

17. August 2021 - 16:38
Climate communications workshop The Power of Communication: Getting civil society heard in times of Covid-19

Forest fires, flash floods, and the coronavirus pandemic have shown the world that we cannot afford to ignore planetary boundaries any longer. Climate action and eliminating fossil fuels and transitioning to renewables is not a nice-to-have, but imperative to our very survival. The climate crisis has become a central issue in election campaigns around the world. Climate communications play a key role in addressing the challenges that lie ahead.

To advocate for urgently needed system change, we need to communicate the why’s and how’s – but how can we do so efficiently during a pandemic, when face-to-face meetings, workshops, or coordinated actions seem like a distant memory?

We know the climate crisis has not halted even as the pandemic has escalated.
People all over the world have gone zoom (or Google meets!) through the last 18 months. How can civil society organisations, which often lack funding or capacity thrive in this new normal? What are the best tips for resource-scarce non-profits to be heard in the digital noise?

Climate Action Network, together with the World Future Council and Brot für die Welt organised a capacity-building webinar on climate communications to strengthen digital communication skills to enhance climate action and accelerate the renewable energy transition.
Over two two-hour workshops, we had in total 150 people attend from different parts of the world, from Latin America to Africa, to discuss tactics and techniques on communications bespoke to their regional context.

The emphasis of the workshop was to focus on easy-to-use tools that can make for an end-to-end communication strategy starting with building a narrative, identifying target audience groups, designing a social media plan, and executing a media relations plan.



Key take-aways

  • Be human – Our narrative needs to centre around the experiences of people and their lived reality while convening the urgency for action to mitigate climate change and advance the energy transition
  • Be relevant – most people want to stay up-to-date with world events, tag on to current discourses to increase reach
  • Be concise – focusing on a few topics and key messages to have more control over the narrative and strengthen messaging
  • Be social – Adapt your message and channels to your target audience and geography. Every market has its favourite social media channels and best use of online tools.
  • Reach out – media outreach, be it print, broadcast or new media is still a dominant part of communication in many parts of the world. Op-eds for instance can be a great way to position yourself and frame your message

Tools

The training materials are all available online: webinar event page, recordings, slide deck.

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Newsletter July 2021

11. August 2021 - 13:56

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Covid, and you? Mental health among young people during the pandemic

9. August 2021 - 11:28

Anna was one of our interns in our team “The Rights of Children and Young People”.  During her internship, she investigated the issue of how the pandemic affects the mental health of children and teens.

Author: Anna Taylor, Covid, and you? Mental health among young people during the pandemic

Covid, and you? Mental health among young people during the pandemic

In the last 8 months, I spent a total of 30 days in a 1-room quarantine; for the first time in my life: everything new and everything different. Two years ago, I decided to finish school at the United World College in Costa Rica. And then Covid happened. As soon as I arrived in Costa Rica, I was taken to a hotel where I went into a 2-week quarantine alone. After that, I finally got to know my campus. However, I was only able to meet a small percentage of the students, as classes were only held online and most students and teachers were not on campus at all. During these times, I noticed changes in the behaviour and attitude of both my friends and myself. Since then, I have been researching about the issue of how the pandemic affects the mental health of children and teens.

During my internship at the World Future Council, I decided to investigate this topic further and conducted a survey. Because I wanted to receive a global impression of the situation, I interviewed 19 young people aged 13-20 from North and South America, Asia, Africa and Europe.

I came up with the following results:

For most young people, the pandemic is a phase of standstill rather than an opportunity for further development. Most everyday activities are either dropped or shifted to the digital. This creates a monotony that is exacerbated by the fact that people look for distraction in digital media and spend most of their time doing so.

Another big issue is the loss of motivation triggered by the lack of perspective. It is interesting to note that this phenomenon was rated similarly across all continents, although the severity of the pandemic varies greatly between countries.

The mental strain on young people is underestimated overall. The most important factors are: increasing fear of uncertainty for the future, weaker relationships with friends, fewer opportunities to meet new people. However, these seem to find little voice in daily life. Especially, regarding boys
this is an issue that is rarely addressed.

After 16 months of the pandemic, a lot has changed in my life as well: I communicate with many of my friends only virtually, avoid human contact, but above all, it has made me aware of the importance of mental well-being in relation to our health.

I would be happy if this short study on mental health could help to give more importance to the topic. On the one hand, to create a higher acceptance for the topic, on the other hand, to proactively deal with the topic; because mental health is just as important as physical health.

Pura Vida!

For the evaluation of my survey, please click on this link: Covid, and you (1).pdf

The post Covid, and you? Mental health among young people during the pandemic appeared first on World Future Council.

Kategorien: Hamburg

An inspiring Future Policy Award Ceremony 2021 celebrated the world’s most impactful policies on protection from hazardous chemicals

20. Juli 2021 - 16:48

What an exciting event we held on 6th July: The World Future Council is truly proud about the Future Policy Award Ceremony 2021, at which our “Oscar for best policies” distinguished five truly exemplary policies protecting people and the environment from hazardous chemicals!

Among the winners were policies from Colombia, Kyrgyzstan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Sweden that effectively minimise the adverse effects of exposure to chemicals on human health and the environment. Two Gold winners and three Special Awards winners were selected from 55 nominated policies from 36 countries.

© Markus Mielek Future Policy Award 2021

Unlike the previous years, the winning policies of the Future Policy Award 2021 were celebrated with a virtual ceremony, held in Hamburg, Germany, on July 6, 2021, and had over a thousand viewers, including the awardees from across the globe. Moderated by Jennifer Sarah Boone, the event was opened by Alexandra Wandel, the Executive Director of World Future Council, who provided insights about the Future Policy Award (3:40) and with speeches by Prof. Dr Dirk Messner, President of the German Environment Agency (UBA), and Sheila Aggarwal-Khan, Director of the Economy Division of the UN Environment Programme (UNEP). (7:00) “Chemicals and chemical waste are a big topic, and we cannot treat them as a side aspect if we want to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. We need to have more political attention for the topic of chemicals and chemical waste; the Future Policy Award makes an exciting contribution to generating this kind of attention,” said Prof. Dr Messner, President of the German Environment Agency (UBA).

Moderator Jennifer Sarah Boone interviews Prof. Dr. Messner

The presentations of the awardees were opened with a beautiful song, “We are one,” from MaximNoise and Nicole Milik, who are both passionate musicians and support the good cause of the 2021 Future Policy Award (13:00).

Special Award for Colombia, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka

Colombia’s Resolution 371 Establishing the elements to be considered in the Management Plans for the Return of Pharmaceutical Products and Expired Medicines (2009) received the first Special Award in the “Environmentally Persistent Pharmaceutical Pollutants” category. The Resolution’s remarkable feature is that it places the responsibilities and costs of implementation on the manufacturers and importers of pharmaceuticals and medications, in line with the ‘polluter pays’ principle. Providing the congratulatory speech, Mr Nikhil Seth, UN Assistant Secretary-General and Executive Director of UNITAR, acknowledged Resolution 371 as the true pioneer in the region and applauded Colombia and all stakeholders for the effective implementation of the policy. The Award was delightfully accepted by H.E. Carlos Eduardo Correa, Colombia’s Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development. (19:50)

Speech by H.E. Carlos Eduardo Correa, Colombia’s Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development

The Philippines’ Chemical Control Order for Lead and Lead Compounds (CCO, 2013-24) won the second Special Award in the Category “Lead in Paint.” The Philippines is the first Southeast Asian country to successfully implement legislation towards lead-safe paint. Acknowledging the importance of risk reduction of lead, the Deputy Secretary-General of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Mr Masamichi Kono, congratulated the Philippines and all stakeholders that contributed to the successful implementation of the Chemical Control Order for Lead and Lead Compounds (28:00). The Award was received by the Secretary of the Philippines Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), H.E. Ret. General Roy Cimatu. (3:00)

The final Special Award went to Sri Lanka’s Pesticides Act and National Policy for Suicide Prevention under the Category “Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs).” Thanks to the policies Sri Lanka has been successful in banning a total of 36 HHPs, which has saved about 93,000 lives over 20 years at a direct government cost of less than USD 50 per life. The Award was received by Sri Lanka’s Minister of Health, Nutrition, and Indigenous Medicine, H.E. Pavitra Devi Wanniarachchi and Minister of Agriculture, H.E. Mahindananda Aluthgamage. (38:40) In her congratulatory speech Prof. Dr Vandana Shiva, who is an internationally well renowned environmental and social activist from India and a Founding Councillor of the World Future Council, highlighted that thanks to these policies suicide rate has been reduced by an impressive 70 per cent.

Gold for Kyrgyzstan and Sweden!

Kyrgyzstan’s Resolution No. 43 won the Gold Award for being one of the few countries in the world to make the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) legally binding.  Kyrgyzstan’s Resolution No. 43 won the Award in the Fourth Category, “Chemicals Across the Lifecycle.” and was commended by Prof. Dr Marie-Claire Cordonier Segger, who is an expert jurist, Senior Director of the Center for International Sustainable Development Law (CISDL) and a Founding Councillor of the World Future Council. Delivering a speech on behalf of Kyrgyzstan’s Deputy of the Cabinet of Ministers and the Minister of Economy and Finance, the First Deputy Minister of Economy and Finance H.E. Daniiar Imanaliev expressed gratitude to the World Future Council for recognizing Resolution No. 43 in the prestigious Future Policy Award 2021. He also expressed their readiness to share their experience with others to create a toxic-free world.

Unlike all the other 2021 Awards that went to national policies, the second Gold Award was won by the Swedish Region Stockholm for its Phase-Out List for chemicals hazardous to the environment and human health in the same category, “Chemicals Across the Lifecycle.” The policy is credited for phasing out a significant proportion of hazardous chemicals since 2012, especially in the health sector. Presenting the laudatory speech for the awardee, a Co-founder and Honorary Councillor of the World Future Council, Prof. Dr Michael Otto commended the Region Stockholm for taken bold action against the use of harmful chemicals and for safeguarding children’s health. (1:00:02) On behalf of Region Stockholm, the Award was received by the Regional Chair for Environment and Transport, Mr. Tomas Eriksson, and Regional Chief Executive, Mrs. Carina Lundberg Uudelepp. (1:03:50)

Congratulation Speech of Prof. Dr. Michael Otto, Honorary Councillor of the World Future Council © Markus Mielek Future Policy Award The Way Forward for the Future Policy Award

Following the award presentations, the Ceremony was also graced with speeches from Dr Auma Obama, Founder and Director of the Sauti Kuu Foundation, and Councillor of the World Future Council, Ms Kehkashan Basu, Founder and President of the Green Hope Foundation and currently the youngest Councillor of the World Future Council, and Mr Jakob von Uexkull, Founder for both the World Future Council and Alternative Noble Prize, who congratulated the awardees for their commitment towards saving millions of lives and protecting critical environmental resources.

Concluding remarks by Alexandra Wandel, Executive Director of the World Future Council © Markus Mielek Future Policy Award

In her concluding remarks, the Executive Director of World Future Council, Alexandra Wandel, reiterated a commitment to continue spreading knowledge about these impactful policies. Asked about what theme will be considered for the next award, she revealed that “the topic is decided by our Council that will be having its annual general meeting in October. During that meeting, they will certainly decide on a highly relevant topic. Once the topic is selected, we will, of course, inform our friends and supporters.” Finally, she thanked all partners, supporters, nominators, experts, and consultants who evaluated the policies and other stakeholders who contributed to the Future Policy Award 2021. The Award Ceremony, which included beautiful artistic contributions such as a stand-up speech by comedian and science journalist Dr Eckart von Hirschhausen, a lead-free painting by NY-based illustrator George Bates and a slam poetry by Berlin-based author Naniso Twsai, ended with a beautiful song cover from the Young ClassX, “Imagine”.

Watch the Award Ceremony More about the FPA 2021

This article was written by Benjamin Dosu Jnr, Ph.D., Volunteer of the World Future Council and Research Assistant, University of Lethbridge.

Pictures of the FPA Ceremony 2021

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Advancing the child protection system in Ghana: One-Stop-Centers for survivors of child violence

12. Juli 2021 - 14:34
Advancing the child protection system in Ghana: One-Stop-Centers for survivors of child violence World Future Council’s consultant on child protection Ramana Shareef travels to Ghana to further advance the One-Stop-Centre model with key stakeholders.

Accra/Hamburg, 12th July 2021 – For the majority of children in Ghana, violence is a terrible part of their everyday life. According to official statistics, 9 out of 10 children are exposed to mental or physical violence, and physical punishment is a common phenomenon. In most cases, limited action is taken to seek medical or psychosocial help for the victims and their families. One-Stop-Centres, however, provide essential services for survivors of abuse under one roof. To further advance and implement the model in Ghana, the World Future Council’s consultant on Child Protection, Ramana Shareef, is now travelling to Accra, Ghana, to discuss the importance of such a model with government representatives, policymakers, medical professionals, and other stakeholders and advance an inter-ministerial agreement to start implementing the pilot. Crucially, this will include discussions on how to put theory into practice.

One-Stop-Centres (OSC) are central contact points for children and their families affected by violence, including sexualised violence. Here, survivors can find psycho-social support, a police office to initiate criminal investigation, as well as medical treatment including collection of forensic evidence, under one roof. Ideally, access to legal services is also part of the centre.

The main objective of the One Stop Centre model is to play the role of an initial umbrella institution for child survivors of abuse, and to provide access to the most essential services under one roof, involving multisectoral collaboration”, says Samia Kassid, Senior Programme Manager “the Rights of Children and Youth”, World Future Council. “Investment in the strengthening of coordination among all professions at One-Stop-Centres will eventually speed up the legal process, which may lead to an increase in the prosecution of perpetrators and awareness raising on the importance to fight (sexual) violence against children.”

During an international conference on child protection, hosted by the World Future Council in Zanzibar in 2017, the One-Stop-Centre model was introduced, which inspired attending Ghanaian policy makers. In 2018 the World Future Council conducted a technical workshop in Ho/Ghana with key Ghanaian stakeholders working on child protection and representatives from the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection as well Ministry of Interior. Together with experts from Zanzibar they explored during a three days’ workshop its feasibility for Ghana and agreed on a pilot roadmap to start in Accra.

The One-Stop-Centre model as an intervention tool of a well-functioning child protection system is part of the Zanzibar’s Children’s Act 2011, which won the Gold Future Policy Award in 2015. For more information on the Future Policy Award 2015, please visit: https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/p/future-policy-award-2015

MEDIA CONTACT

Anna-Lara Stehn

Media & Communications Manager

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org



About the World Future Council

The World Future Council (WFC) works to pass on a healthy and sustainable planet with just and peaceful societies to our children and grandchildren. To achieve this, we focus on identifying, developing, highlighting, and spreading effective, future-just solutions for current challenges humanity is facing, and promote their implementation worldwide. The Council consists of 50 eminent global change-makers from governments, parliaments, civil societies, academia, the arts, and the business world. Jakob von Uexkull, the Founder of the Alternative Nobel Prize, launched the World Future Council in 2007. We are an independent, non-profit organisation under German law and finance our activities with institutional partnerships and donations.

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Kategorien: Hamburg

2021 Future Policy Award Brochure – Protection from Hazardous Chemicals

7. Juli 2021 - 15:22
About the Future Policy Award 2021 Brochure

This brochure is presenting the winners of the Future Policy Award 2021 on Protection from hazardous chemicals.

Championing and spreading effective, future-just policy solutions is the principal goal of the World Future Council. Our Future Policy Award is the first award that celebrates legislation and policies for the benefit of current and future generations at an international level. The aim of the award is to raise global awareness about these exemplary laws and speed up action towards just, sustainable and peaceful societies.

Each year we select a priority topic in which policy action is particularly needed. Some of the key global issues that we have addressed include children’s rights, youth empowerment, food security, agroecology. In 2021, we are awarding policy solutions that protect people, especially children, and the environment from hazardous chemicals.

We are proud to present to you the winners of the Future Policy Award 2021 and we encourage policymakers globally to adopt and implement key elements of these inspiring, innovative and effective policies in their own countries, states and cities.

The Future Policy Award 2021 would not have been possible without our partners and donors! The World Future Council would like to sincerely thank all of them for their generous support – and all the jury members and nominators, researchers and experts who have supported our evaluation process. We are immensely grateful for your precious work and recommendations.Enjoy reading and do visit our website to find out more about the 2021 Awardees.


Read in English (PDF)
Leer en español (PDF)
Lisez en français (PDF)

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Kategorien: Hamburg

Le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir récompense les cinq meilleures initiatives de protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux

6. Juli 2021 - 11:40
Le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir récompense les cinq meilleures initiatives de protection contre les produits chimiques dangereux

Cette année, « l’Oscar » de l’action publique a été décerné à des initiatives de la Colombie, du Kirghizistan, des Philippines, de Sri Lanka et de la Suède.

Genève, Hambourg, Nairobi, Paris, 29 juin 2021 – Le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir est attribué à cinq lois et mesures inspirantes et puissantes. Ce prix, surnommé l’« Oscar des meilleures politiques », récompense les initiatives publiques qui ont le mieux réussi à réduire au minimum les effets néfastes de l’exposition aux produits chimiques sur la santé humaine et l’environnement. Sur les 55 initiatives de 36 pays présélectionnées, deux ont reçu le prix Or et trois le prix Spécial. Les lauréats de cette année sont :

Prix OR

  • Kirghizistan: résolution n° 43 portant approbation du Système de classification des dangers chimiques et des exigences d’information concernant les dangers – Étiquetage et fiche de données de sécurité (2015)
  • Suède (comté de Stockholm): Liste des substances chimiques dangereuses pour l’environnement et la santé humaine devant faire l’objet d’une élimination progressive (2012-16, révisée pour la période 2017-21)

Prix SPÉCIAL

  • Prix spécial « Pesticides très dangereux » : Sri Lanka, Loi n° 33 sur les pesticides (1980, modifiée en 1994, 2011 et 2020) et politique nationale et plan d’action national de prévention du suicide (1997)
  • Prix spécial « Peintures au plomb » : Philippines, décret relatif à la vérification chimique applicable au plomb et à ses composés (2013-24)
  • Prix spécial « Polluants pharmaceutiques persistants » : Colombie, résolution n° 371 portant définition des éléments à prendre en considération dans les plans de gestion des retours de produits pharmaceutiques et de médicaments périmés (2009)

La remise des prix aura lieu le 6 juillet 2021 à l’occasion d’une cérémonie à distance. Pour y participer, il suffit de s’inscrire à l’adresse : https://www.worldfuturecouncil.org/fpa-2021-ceremony/. Puis les initiatives lauréates seront à l’honneur le 8 juillet 2021, à l’occasion du Forum de Berlin sur la durabilité des produits chimiques.

Le World Future Council (WFC) organise et décerne ce prix chaque année en partenariat avec le Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE), l’Approche stratégique de la gestion internationale des produits chimiques (SAICM), l’Organisation mondiale du Travail (OIT), l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE), l’Institut des Nations Unies pour la formation et la recherche (UNITAR) et le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD), avec le soutien des fondations Michael Otto et Jua.

« L’absence de gestion rationnelle des produits chimiques, qui font pourtant partie intégrante du quotidien, provoque l’intoxication de notre planète et de toutes les formes de vie qui y existent. Il est absolument impératif de consolider la bonne gouvernance des produits chimiques et des déchets en adoptant des lois et règles efficaces, mobilisatrices et innovantes, à l’image de celles récompensées par le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir. Elles créent un précédent qui, espérons-le, servira à un grand nombre de pays », estime la Directrice exécutive du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE), Inger Andersen.

« Chaque année, 1 500 nouveaux produits chimiques arrivent sur le marché », ajoute Achim Steiner, Administrateur du Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD). « Beaucoup n’ont pas été soumis aux essais de sécurité et de toxicité voulus alors qu’ils peuvent occasionner des dommages irréversibles à la santé humaine, à la faune, à la flore et aux écosystèmes. Les initiatives colombienne, kirghize, philippine, sri-lankaise et suédoise récompensées par le Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir sont autant de solutions efficaces pour lutter contre les aspects critiques de cet enjeu mondial. »

Il importe également de prendre en considération l’exposition aux substances chimiques dangereuses dans le milieu professionnel. Il n’est pas rare que les travailleurs soient exposés à des doses plus élevées sur des périodes plus longues, risquant ainsi davantage d’en subir gravement les effets sanitaires. Beaucoup travaillent dans l’économie informelle ou dans des secteurs qui emploient fréquemment de telles substances avec peu de précautions, notamment l’agriculture et les activités extractives. Alors que le monde du travail a besoin de politiques judicieuses, les initiatives lauréates du Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir illustrent comment améliorer la sécurité et la santé au travail et comment promouvoir une gestion rationnelle des produits chimiques et des déchets dans le monde entier. De l’avis du Directeur général de l’Organisation internationale du Travail (OIT), Guy Ryder, « il est de notre devoir de réaffirmer que chacun a le droit de travailler dans un environnement sûr et sain[1] ».

Pour choisir les lauréats parmi la sélection finale, le jury a appliqué les sept principes normatifs d’un avenir juste, qui servent de fondement à une conception unique de l’analyse des politiques. Ainsi que l’explique Jakob von Uexkull, fondateur du World Future Council : « Nous passons au crible chaque initiative en nous interrogeant sur l’essentiel : par exemple, est-ce que l’initiative à l’examen prévoit de consulter le grand public et de l’associer véritablement aux processus de rédaction, d’exécution, de suivi et d’évaluation ? Il convient de noter que la catégorie « Présence de substances chimiques dans les produits » est l’une des rares dans lesquelles aucune candidature n’a été présentée. Il reste encore beaucoup à faire dans ce domaine. Nous nous réjouissons de pouvoir présenter au monde des exemples d’initiatives bénéfiques. Nous nous emploierons à les faire connaître afin qu’elles incitent d’autres pays à se montrer encore plus ambitieux. »

Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous à l’adresse :

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

https://twitter.com/Good_Policies

—-

[1]Édition 2017 du Congrès mondial sur la santé et la sécurité au travail.



Ce projet bénéficie du concours financiers de :   

 

Le contenu de la présente publication relève de la responsabilité de l’éditeur.

Avec le soutien de la Fondation Michael Otto et de la Fondation Jua.



Contact médias

Anna-Lara Stehn

Responsable Médias et Communication

World Future Council

anna-lara.stehn@worldfuturecouncil.org

Note aux éditeurs

À propos du Prix de l’action d’avenir

Chaque année, le Prix de l’action d’avenir est attribué aux initiatives les plus efficaces face aux principaux impératifs de l’humanité. Il est actuellement le seul qui récompense, à l’échelle internationale, les politiques mises en œuvre pour le bénéfice des générations présentes et futures. L’objectif est de mieux faire connaître les politiques exemplaires à travers le monde et d’accélérer l’action publique. Le World Future Council décerne ce prix annuel depuis 2010 en partenariat avec les institutions des Nations Unies et l’UIP.

 

À propos des initiatives lauréates du Prix 2021 de l’action d’avenir

www.worldfuturecouncil.org/chemicals

 

À propos du World Future Council

Le World Future Council (WFC) s’est donné pour mission de transmettre à nos enfants et petits-enfants une planète saine et viable ainsi que des sociétés vivant dans la justice et la paix. Pour ce faire, il s’emploie à recenser, à étoffer, à mettre en avant et à diffuser des moyens efficaces et à terme équitables de venir à bout des problèmes qui assaillent aujourd’hui l’humanité, de même qu’il promeut leur mise en œuvre dans le monde entier. Il réunit 50 acteurs du changement de renommée mondiale issus des sphères administrative et parlementaire, de la société civile, du monde de l’université, des arts et des affaires. Lancé en 2007 par Jakob von Uexkull, le fondateur du « Prix Nobel alternatif », Le WFC est une fondation indépendante à but non lucratif de droit allemand, qui finance ses activités grâce aux partenariats institutionnels et aux dons.

Partenaires :

 

À propos du Programme des Nations Unies pour l’environnement (PNUE) et de l’Approche stratégique de la gestion internationale des produits chimiques (SAICM)

https://www.unep.org/

http://www.saicm.org/

À propos de l’Organisation internationale du Travail (OIT)

https://www.ilo.org/

À propos de l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE)

https://www.oecd.org/fr/

À propos du Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD)

https://www1.undp.org/content/undp/fr/home.html

À propos de l’Institut des Nations Unies pour la formation et la recherche (UNITAR)

https://unitar.org

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Kategorien: Hamburg